What are/is/will be your most important steps towards recovery?

Finding inner peace so i can live with myself

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Keep working. Start up going to CA meetings again. Support groups.

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I’m not sure I believe recovery is possible. I’m sorry I’m being a downer, but that’s how I feel.

Maybe no one makes a full recovery but people do get better.

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For me recovery means no more self destructive behavior, when I don’t care if I’m ill or not and don’t take meds for it. It means putting my mental health as a priority, so I can live better with the illness. Means being functional, being able to clean my apartment and not make a mess of everything. Means good relationships, not toxic ones. I’m sure it would mean something else to you, but try to think about it.

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I’ve never been up to par in society. Even as a kid I was troubled and didn’t race .

I just want to do God’s will above all else in this life… and I think volunteering and offering my digital art might be the big guy’s will for me

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But yes. Taking meds and communicating with doc. I go to aa meetings. No drinking or drug abuse.

I’m so impressed with you @Minnii . I am on disability and just now living alone at nearly 40 years old because I couldn’t afford rent until lately with gov help. I wonder if I was in your shoes if I’d do as well as you…

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Thank you. I’ve been finding strenght where I didn’t know I had. I think you would do fine.

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Staying sober (been sober since Nov 1st.)
Getting some exercise
Eat healthier
Keep some sort of social life going and refrain from isolating.
Take sarcosine for a while and see how it goes

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Staying truly compliant by taking the antidepressants as well the antipsychotics. Getting the most out of what’s left of my life. Learning to live more on my own. And following the Serenity Prayer to the letter.

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Getting a job and keeping it.
Doing some exercise.
Keep meeting people who still welcome me into their lives.
All of the above makes me feel better and get better.

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You really seem like you have a great set of goals to work towards. I still have hope, it’s just that it’s been so long that I feel it will be much harder. But on a positive note, at least I have the right diagnosis. You are always so positive and helpful. Thank you.

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You’re welcome. I try to be positive, sometimes it’s hard.
You’re positive too, but it’s never easy to be diagnosed with sz, takes some time to adjust.
Like malvok said, it’s the mindset towards recovery. You’ll get there, I’m sure.

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Taking my meds, not isolating and challenging my thoughts (delusions).

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I don’t know but moving into my own quiet apartment out of my grandma’s madhouse of sound and chaos probably helped greatly. It’s still only true for people who call from her house to be the only time I have to hold the phone away from my ear to keep the sheer background noise from hurting my ears.

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Ive recovered now for 6 months but I took rispiridone for 3 years and it helped a lot with the symptoms but i didnt like the side affects anxiety and apathy people told me that schizophrenia is incurable but Im cured Im so happy I feel great

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First things first, i need to find a reason to get out of bed.

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trying and succeeding somewhat at getting along better with my mom. :grinning:

judy

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I think the most significant step towards my recovery occurred from within my first and main psychotic episode. I had been delusional for half a year but, at some point, came to establish a different, more useful, and less distressing interpretation of the phenomena I was experiencing. Which amounted to it being some psychotic disorder, likely schizophrenia.

At a certain level of inquiry, one stumbles upon the conceptualization of experiences. I think that, although there are habitual ways of doing so, there is some freedom here which consists in one being ‘allowed’ to choose a different conceptualization, although the force of habit can be rather strong. Ponderings aside, I came to want it to be schizophrenia rather than the alternative, the delusional conception I had applied to the experience for a long time.

I think this was the most significant step in my recovery, for it eased so many other steps along that road. I did not have to carry the burden that the SZ diagnosis can present to some. For in a sense, I got what I wanted when being diagnosed officially. That is to say, I took these experiences as a given, the only relevant options being ones conceptualization of those. ‘Normal’ wasn’t even an option given these experiences. I have often sighed in relief that it was merely schizophrenia and not [insert delusional interpretation of reality here]. I think it has eased issues concerning (self-)stigma as well. It also benefited treatment adherence and self-esteem I think.

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For me, med’s are the most important part of my recovery. I don’t think I can ever get off them. Not isolating - socializing is important too. If I am able to, I completely avoid all human contact. I’ve gotten pretty weird before from being too isolated. Sobriety is also important. I can drink and not relapse, but I need to quit drinking for my physical health. I probably shorten my life span by drinking. I don’t particularly want to live forever, but I need time to accomplish the things I want to accomplish.

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