Schizophrenia.com

I quit smoking- it's been two weeks


#1

I am chewing nicotine gum but I have made it two weeks without tobacco. I will have to talk to my psychiatrist about outright quitting nicotine, as it effects the blood level of my medication- he told me to see him if I ever quit nicotine products. The first week was pretty horrible, the first night was pretty crap, I was sweating and restless. I get cravings in the mornings and at night. The morning cravings are pretty bad- I have considered caving in and having just one cigarette but remind myself that smoking will make me die early.

But for your information, nicotine does interact with most of our medications- a good psychiatrist will tell you to make an appointment to talk if you are a regular smoker and want to quit. I am on nicarette so I am still getting some nicotine, but I have noticed that I am a little sluggish. Nicotine is a CNS stimulant and peripheral NS depressant- it is also theorized to relieve symptoms, researchers have noticed that 80-90% of schizophrenics smoke cigarettes.

I picked the habit up when I was 18 and slowly but surely crumbling, and then when I began to hallucinate and experience delusions I started smoking half a pack every day, I would basically chain smoke after school. When I started college I really became a chimney, as I was free to smoke on campus and I began to smoke a pack a day. That and I had trouble sleeping every night and smoked at like midnight in an effort to go to sleep.

What made me quit was a moment of deep thought while driving home at night- I had just smoked a cigarette and it was my 17th cigarette that day and it was about 830pm- I remembered how I was before schizophrenia and how I said I would never become a smoker- so I stopped at walgreens and bought a big box of nicarette.

It’s already better, I dont have to go outside every 45 minutes, I dont smell like crap, my mouth doesnt taste like an ashtray, ect. I’m 21 now and have needed to quit for two years. It feels good to be able to hangout with my friends and family and not have to go outside and smoke periodically.

In a few weeks I am supposed to cut down on the nicarette- the box has a little pamphlet guide which had a 12 week nicotine-free program on it. Im going to see the doc soon like he told me to.


#2

I used wellbutrin. It’s been almost 2 years for me. I stayed in my bed for 3 days, a dark room and didn’t leave my bedroom. Just slept for the first three days and then I had to stay away from smokers but now I’m over it.

You are doing well.


#3

It has been 1year 9 months and 8 days for me. apparently according to the quitit app I have saved $5000 since… wow. I used nicotine plasters and wellbutrin, but i needed both of them only for one week, and I was completely smoke + smoke aid free after 7 days. Oddly, my second day of non smoking was my first day at a new job and i even managed that.


#4

All your stories are inspiring. I am going to try and stop in about a day or so. I try and then I have failed before. I just keep trying.


#5

Good for you… Keep up the hard work. It’s nice to see you start to kick this. Good luck and I hope it goes easy for you.

I’m down to two a day and holding. On September 1st, I’ll drop down to one a day.

It was hard to start dropping… I used to smoke to mask my symptoms. If something got to me… run out side and smoke… If I forgot what I was going to say… don’t let on, but light up. If I was panicked… go out side and smoke…

The more I’ve learned how to cope with people, the less I’ve been lighting up.


#6

This is great news, Mortimer and J! I helped my ex boyfriend quit once.
It will add years to your life and money to your wallet.


#7

I used wellbutrin for over 2 years to be truly successful. I didn’t quit it till I knew I was done for sure.


#8

I think that the real celebration will begin when you get off the nicotine gum, but just the fact that you stopped smoking is a big deal - congratulations Mortimer :smiley:


#9

I quit smoking – it’s been 9 days – cold turkey with no nicotine replacement. I still feel solidly behind this and I’m determined remain smoke-free. @mortimermouse and @SurprisedJ, and @Anne reward yourself for your hard work.


#10

Good for you, MMouse! I’m currently five weeks without smoking, and I was a heavy smoker for many years. I have had much support from my General Practitioner as well as friends and family.

Jayster