Human case study: bone marrow stem cell transplant and a 60 point PANSS reduction

In this case study a young man diagnosed with sz as a teen and then later diagnosed with cancer received a bone marrow transplant (a kind of stem cell transplant) and had a remission of his sz.

I hope they will follow his progress to see how long his remission lasts. This gives hope to possibilities for stem cell treatments that do not have to be directly applied to the brain and perhaps could be administered intravenously to avoid surgical risks.

A 60 point reduction is huge. Most clinical trials for drugs, they’re happy with an average 15 or 20 point reduction.

https://www.psychcongress.com/posters/serendipitous-improvement-schizophrenia-after-triple-bone-marrow-stem-cell-transplant-cancer

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"In a period of 8 months, after the second BMT, patient’s PANSS dropped 60 points, his hallucinations decreased 90%, and he improved his negative, cognitive and social symptoms, which allowed him to gradually reincorporate to his usual social and academic life. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been proposed as an alternative therapy for many chronic and incurable diseases. In psychiatry, the theory is that these HSC migrate to areas of inflammation in the brain via chemotaxis, and, through immunomodulation and secretion of bioactive molecules enhance neurogenesis, angiogenesis and remodeling of axonal circuits. "

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That means 60% cure… not 100%… tho good find… thanks for sharing…!!!

How was ur x mas @twinklestars… i was thinking of u … u were dearly missed my sister… take care…

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I have thought about it long and hard and stem cells is the only thing that makes 100% sense.

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Stem cell may take a century ahead…thats for sure…!!!

No it shouldn’t take that long. What we need is pluripotent stem cells and a scientist willing to look into it. If we started tomorrow the technology would be ready in about 10yrs time.

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Lets hope so …!!!

Dont forget it will be super expensive… U and I cant afford it for sure …!!! What do u think…!!

I am sure scientist are looking forward to it …!!!

Some people have died after rejecting new stem cells. It is also super expensive. I think its unlikely to get approved for sz or for insurance to pay for it.
Bone marrow transplant from a donor can cost $800,000 .

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Hi gentle soul i am looking for broad institute next breakthrough …
Cuz they have 650 million in their pocket gifted by sir ted stanly. I will be glad if they find out next genetic causes of sz… i am sure within 5 year they will come out with next breakthrough that is second genetic causes of schizophernia …

A 60 point reduction doesn’t translate to 60% cure. The percentage reduction would depend on where he started, which we don’t know. But it did say his hallucinations (which they said were voices) dropped by 90%.

As some have said, yeah, we can’t be giving everyone bone marrow transplants. It involves chemo, killing off your own cells, probably the possibility of rejection. I’m not sure if you have to take immunosupressants. But anyway, bone marrow transplants wouldn’t be the way, it just shows that new, healthy stem cells can help. How to get them in there without rejection, have them survive, etc is the question.

And they are working on it. A couple of biotechs are working on universal donor stem cells that can be produced en masse, relatively cheaply.

This is more of a proof of a concept.

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Do u know if there is a team of scientists looking into universal donor stem cells for sz? IMO UD stem cells should be ready to hit thr market in about 10yrs tops.

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i wonder if his improvement will be permanent?

Not that I know of. It’s a little premature because universal donor stem cells aren’t yet available.

But there is still ongoing research, here’s a good article where the researcher mentions sz and resetting critical periods for connectivity.

http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC5313260/

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Interesting article:"“With all potential therapies involving placing cells in the brain, one has to be very cautious,” Gandhi said. “But what we hope is that this study, along with many others, begins to open the door to the therapeutic viability of cell-based approaches.”"

And article 2:" human pluripotent stem cells via directed differentiation approaches or somatic cells through direct reprogramming methods are emphasized."

I truly believe cell therapy is what we are looking for. I am sure there are teams investigating it for Alzheimer’s disease.

Have u ever heard about intrathecal stem cells therapy?(https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01019733)

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This caught my eye also: “Pluripotent stem cells in neuropsychiatric disorders”

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They will find out causes of sz first then stem cell… what do u think…

I dont think theyll ever understand the causes of sz. Its just too complex. But they should look into Universal Donor Pluripotent Stem Cells (UDPSC) for it.

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Id say he is one of the 1 in 11 that has a immune disorder that shows up with symptoms of schizophrenia, Just like i read the other week that someone had a marrow transplant and developed schizophrenic symptoms it turned out they had a immune disorder.

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This is a different person (apparently, different authors on the paper)

He had remission apparently for at least 8 years from treatment resistant sz. If you read the paper, first it says at 2 and 4 years, then further down, 8.

“Thirty days later, his psychotic symptom had almost disappeared. He was sustained without any neuroleptic treatment and need for any other administration. His psychiatric status was assessed by the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (24). Social functioning was assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale of the DSM-IV-TR (21). The treatment and clinical course are shown in Figure 1. In 2017, 8 years after BMT, the improvements of somatic and psychiatric symptoms are continued, and the patient is very well and there are no residual psychiatric symptoms. Moreover, his social functioning was drastically recovered, and he continues to work at a famous company”

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