Schizophrenia.com

Sounds in fan psychosis?

I keep on hearing music or phone ringing sounds when using my induction stove which has ventilator fan.

I’ve heard on another group it’s common with some sz/sza sufferers to hear sounds or voices within white noise like fans or the sea or so on.

My question is - is it normal to hear other sounds within white noise sounds or is it particular to psychosis/sz/sza?

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There is something called Auditory Pareidolia. It is the same as visual pareidolia i.e. seeing faces in shapes like clouds or patterns but for noise.

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I used to have that on 3-4mg Risperdal but not since I am on 6mg so I think its psychosis related. My mind now on 6mg is so calm and I am never angry or irritable.

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I’ve been told that anyone (without Sz/SzA) can hear things within/from white noise. But people with Sz/SzA are much more likely to hear things in white noise, and much more often.

I hear distorted hallucinations from white noise, almost every day. My husband hears something maybe once every 5 months or so.

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On 4mg Risperdal when I was alone I used to hear my mother call me or the doorbell ring but no one was there I was alone in my house and no one was outside ringing the doorbell.

It is super duper common. I know loads of people with no MI who hear that. It is a pretty common form of tinnitus.

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What’s the difference between auditory pareidolia and functional hallucinations? The former is common and supposedly normal but the latter is supposed to be rare and pertaining to psychosis. Confused me.

I heard my father calling my name when I was in the shower.
It’s common for these white noise hallucinations to occur, even for ‘normal’ folks.

I get “white noise” hallucinations frequently. But when I get psychotic, the white noise isn’t necessary and I hallucinate without it. And when psychotic, the hallucinations are more persistent and intense.

So how do I tell if it’s psychosis or not? Am I not psychotic then? Maybe my sza is not real then…dunno…

I think it kinda depends on how often you have these sound distortions and how much they trouble you.

I often hear my phone ringing, over and over, when I’m in the shower. I also hear my husband yelling for me, like he’s in trouble. It really stresses me out. It happens most days. And on days that it happens, it happens multiple times throughout the day.

I even hear people whispering to me, from the ceiling fan above our bed. It stresses me out, when I’m trying to fall asleep, but I hear people talking to me. Sometimes, I hear my husband talking to me, but he’s asleep.

I think part of it is paranoia. Like, I’m paranoid that Hubby needs me (like something urgent), while I’m showering, and that’s why I hear him yelling for me. I also hate missing important phone calls, and so I think that’s why I often hear my phone ringing when I can’t get to it, such as in the shower.

Hope that helps. :confused: You could bring this up to your pdoc and see what they say, too. It’s always good to keep your pdoc in the loop.

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If you read the examples in the posts you will tend to find that all these hallucinations are what they expect to hear. It is as if the mind pre-prepares itself for what they inevitably expect to happen.

For example:

With auditory pareidolia it is much the same, but given the scenarios of white noise it makes it more predictable as the environment makes it so that the hearer cannot listen 100%, so the mind makes up what s/he expects to hear more often.

There is a phenomena of the opposite where the quietest room on the planet ( a room with parabolic panels creating super silence) also creates hallucinations even for the neurotypical, so for example, if you lay in bed and have silence and tinnitus you are bound to hear these auditory pareidolia or plain old hallucinations.

A sz is more susceptible to these auditory pareidolia as they are more likely to hallucinate given the right environment.

Neruotypical cannabis users are also more likely to develop auditory pareidolia even to the extent of paranoid delusions as backed by certain studies.

Given this new knowledge that a large majority of people can develop these hallucinations given the same environment, you can prepare yourself for them, avoid them and understand them better as needs be. In this way you can overcome any worries you have been having.

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Honestly if it doesn’t bother you just ignore it, its better to be on the lowest AP dose possible to prevent worsening of negative symptoms.

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I heard that the term for hearing voices in the sounds of appliances, or things like the wind, is called “ghost radio.”

I remember hearing high pitched frequency sounds coming out of my guitar amp. But it wasn’t even turned on. My voices said it was interfering with their frequency and to unplug it. So I unplugged it lol.

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