Schizophrenia.com

Schizophrenia can be caused by gluten in your opinion and casein in food?it's possible?

that was the idea of the doctor dohan

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Had looked into it seems it’s only those with a closer relationship to the autism spectrum that gain any benefit from a gluten free diet. Damn expensive diet also. Tried it for awhile and something like half a loaf of bread cost $5.00 which was tasteless and I could only get it pre frozen. With no noticeable difference in symptoms I gave up on it in the end. Worth a shot though as may help.

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Okay, that’s interesting to know.

10-96

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i tried the gluten free as well and dairy free. no difference. tried it for over 6 months.

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Same… tried the gluten free… no difference in the symptoms… nothing changed. It was expensive… so I’m back on normal bread now…

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Even for those with ASD, there is often no noticable difference. In certain kids, I can always tell if they accidentally got hold of some gluten, but in others, it doesn’t do anything. I think it has more to do with who was raised on a gluten free diet. If your body has gotten used to eating a certain way, it revolts against a sudden change. This is also why vegetarians get sick after eating meat. It isn’t that meat is bad for you; it’s just that their bodies have adapted to a certain diet.

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I don’t know if it can be caused by it but it maybe could aggravate symptoms in people with gluten & dairy sensitives. I avoid gluten & dairy for the most part because they make me feel sick & irritable & exacerbate my symptoms.

NOTHING Is Wrong With Gluten ,

I Tried It Out ,

Tha Gluten Thing Is A Lie .

Gluten is only a threat to those with celiac’ disease or a not otherwise specified gluten allergy.

The gluten scare craze is ridiculous and was started by the results of one study that was later proven false, very similar to the vaccine scare.

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I Never Heard Of A Vaccine Scare ,

But I Do Have An Intense Fear Of Needle ,

and I Have Got To Face That Fear Once Every Freakin Month ,

Thankfully The Nurse Is Good At Her Job ,

So During Tha Moment Of Caged Animal Abuse Hitler Pain Threat She Kills The Fear With An Alcoholic Touch ,

Which Is Also SLightly Scary ,

N E Hoo ,

Carry on …

There was a study published a while back saying vaccines cause autism. It was proven false, yet for some reason it caught on and now there are a ton of people who aren’t vaccinating their kids, causing outbreaks in diseases that haven’t had outbreaks in a very long time. Many babies and others with weakened immune systems have gotten sick from these unvaccinated kids. Not to mention the kids themselves get sick…

Always fact check information, and get it from multiple sources.

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No kidding. I firmly believe you should be forced to prove you have vaccinated your children before being allowed to put them in schools and other public programs. If your child is a massive safety risk due to lack of vaccination, keep it away from others.

10-96

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Oh, wow, I’m glad I found this thread. I’ve been gluten free since the mid '80s. Yes, it worked for me, up to a point. I actually have a copy of Dr. Dohan’s article, and you guys are absolutely right, When Dr. Dohan tried the gluten free diet on some patients, it wasn’t just gluten free, it was gluten and dairy free. I figured out that I probably had an ASD. There is a form of autism called purine autism, it’s related to gout. My father had gout. When I say the gf/cf diet worked up to a point, when I went through the change of life, I began to slip. It took me a couple of years to figure out that I am also very intolerant of beans. And as I go into my middle sixties, I have to pay attention to allergens or the horrible headaches come back. I was hoping to connect with other people who found that the gf/cf diet, because I wonder if they find they have additional food sensitivities. Thanx for any help you folks can give me.

Very much relying on memory, but think I recall it’s only something like only 10% of schizophrenics that will benefit from gluten free. Wasn’t much at any rate. Defiantly worth trying as no real side effects from it and if it helps it’s worth it.

Thank you, Dreamscape. Actually, I’ve been gluten free since about 1983 or '84. I had been having terrible headaches, and I heard voices, hospitalized once, had problems keeping my thoughts in order and under control. My diagnosis was schizoaffective disorder… stelazine, haldol. When I finally went on the gf diet, I found I could think clearer and even better, the daily migraines stopped. I stayed gluten free out of fear of those headaches. The voices I attributed to a B12 deficiency. My psychiatrist didn’t approve, not supportive. I recovered enough to get jobs and stay employed for years.Which would be a success story, but in the end, I didn’t have an explanation for what happened to me. I have holes in my medical record. I used to be honest about it when I changed doctors, but they were either dismissive of my experience or considered me either a liar or someone seeking attention. For the longest time, I never found anyone who was diagnosed with plain ordinary celiac disease. When I finally went to a celiac conference, I had the shock of my life. I always had a pot belly, and I’m short. These folks were taller and thinner. I would get severely constipated. The hallmark of celiac disease is diarrhea. So I figured something else was going on. In the 1990’s, there was a mailing list/support group for celiacs. Some of the members of that mailing list were parents of ASD kids on the gluten free diet. So I asked questions…we all had questions. I figured out then I was likely ASD myself (which I considered kinda hilarious because the view was that autism was something new, only affecting kids, and I was in my mid to late 40’s.) I had acquired a copy of Dr. Dohan’s “An Internist Looks At Schizophrenia” which I still have. I was the one to pointed out that in his locked ward experiment, his patients were put on a gluten free, milk free diet, and quite maddeningly, he never explained why he focused on wheat as the cause and not dairy. Questions, questions, questions. I still couldn’t nail down what this disease is. It pissed me off, because I vowed that I would hunt it down and expose it for what it is.

Dreamscape, when I was in the disease, I suffered. Those headaches were intolerable. I had bloating, and sometimes it felt like my brain had swollen up and was too big, like it was being squeezed up against my skull. Sometimes that swelling extended down my spinal cord. I vomited frequently. When I recovered, I vowed that no one should have to suffer like that. My voices were like a Greek chorus of doom. Shrieking at me to give up, that there was no hope. I have a theory on that…because I don’t believe I had it in me to be so negative.

Anyway, back in the late '90’s, I googled part of my family history: gout and autism. There’s actually a form of autism that’s in the same family as gout. It’s called purine autism. I started going to conferences on autism, and talking to other parents, asking if there was gout in the family. Now, I didn’t keep records, this was very informal, but more times than not, there was an acknowledgement of either gout or arthritis in the family. Which was wonderful, because it gives it a name, and a treatment. So I waited to hear more about advances in the field of purine autism. The website, purine autism.org, hasn’t changed in almost 20 years. I found a couple other references to it, one on Great Plains laboratory, and the other, a doctor commenting that in these kids that are diagnosed with purine autism, they may pass a lot of uric acid, but that seems to go away as they age into puberty.

So it seems that only in the most severe cases was there a diagnosis, and for all others, it was unimportant. That all I could make of it. Purine autism was not , is not, taken seriously. I assume that’s why there has been no movement on this, no push to identify and address the needs of people who are somewhat affected. I always felt that if we could aggressively define and diagnose the ASDs in the pool, whatever remains gives a clearer idea of schizophrenia. We ASDers are muddying the water.

I think purine autism is not taken seriously because after the child goes into puberty, the sex hormones kick in and accommodate for an overabundance of nitrogen. (purines are made up of nitrogen and they are necessary for life). When I went through “the change” , and my hormones diminished, I was hit by a wall of inflammation. I’ve heard it referred to as brain fog. I developed a lot of inflammation in my gut, gained a lot of weight. I knew I was trying to appease the gods of inflammation…I must have gained 50 pounds. I finally figured out that anytime I ate beans, it was worse. First it was soy sauce. Then I noticed that kidney beans also gave me trouble. My muscles would tense up and ache. Green beans caused terrible throbbing in my feet and ankles. One by one, I eliminated all the beans. This includes products made with soybean oil (like mayo, my favorite condiment, and guar gum, a common thickener found in a lot of gluten free foods.) With all the beans out, I began feeling better. At my next physical, my doctor noted that my cholesterol had dropped from somewhere in the low 400’s to a way more manageable 250-ish.

For me, this answers a question – is cholesterol the cause of inflammation or a response to inflammation? High cholesterol seems to be a response to inflammation. Uric acid is anti- inflammatory. So high levels of uric acid in gout are also a response to inflammation. Who knows, when people have high glucose levels, can this also be a physical response to a type of inflammation? I don’t know…but I’ve been very careful trying to identify my triggers. One last thing that seals the deal for me. That locked ward with the gluten-free and milk free diet. It turns out that Dr. Dohan considered milk to be a source of inflammation, and that’s why it was left out of the diet. For us with (self diagnosed, but a family history of) purine metabolic defects, it’s all about controlling the inflammation. Dr. Dohan did marvelous work for his time.

I don’t think he could have succeeded in today’s milieu. In my quest, I had the chance to hear a lecture on autism by Dr. Bernard Rimland, of the Autism Research Institute. Aside from his stance on vaccines, he made the very valid point that autism seems to be on the increase. As best as I can remember, In the 1950’ and most of the 1960’s, we mostly got our vegetable oils from corn. Soy and soybean oil started to be in greater use (my theory) in the '60’s and definitely in the '70’s and I remember textured vegetable protein (soy) was introduced in the 1970’s also. We knew that some people have soy allergies. Also, we know that soy is a weak phytoestrogen. If the patients on the locked ward had ingested the amount of soy as we have in our diet today, would they have recovered so quickly? I honestly couldn’t tell you. As for myself, I have to consider all legumes as toxic as I consider wheat to be toxic. For me, legumes produce painful bloating and inflammation and diarrhea worse than a gluten exposure. Makes me wonder if wheat is not the sole known trigger for autoimmunity.

So, Dreamscape, thank you for listening. My intended audience is more for the researcher than for the patient. Anything I said is an observation, not intended for medical advice until vetted. It needs to be vetted. And one last thing…I mentioned markers for inflammation…I think for gout, it’s uric acid, and for us, it’s nitric oxide. Nitrogen, but in a different form. I was looking for validation that too much nitric oxide was a bad thing…thinking back on brain fog, maybe that’s too much nitrogen crossing the blood brain barrier. I was looking up ways to counter nitric oxide and was chasing down lysine…found a survey here, on this site, whether folks found it helpful. Lysine decreases nitric oxide production. Like I said, we gotta figure a way to get us ASD folks tagged and out of the pool. Way too many of us unrecognized and given inappropriate treatment. There’s just final point about the best research I found helping to treat autism that I swear by…Dr. Mary Megson’s treatise on Vitamin A and g alpha protein defects. I use Vitamin A and consider it to be as necessary as Vitamin D. But again, not medical advice as much as an observation.

Thanks for listening!

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Yes - there is conflicting evidence it seems on this issue. The point of whether this is real still seems contentious.

"there is much evidence, not without contradictions, of a possible association between schizophrenia and celiac disease."

Source:

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I read it in the medical related books that. One of the kid who were having a massive schizophrenia symptoms got lot better after switching to vegan diet.

Anybody know if this is true or has related article?

I have coeliac disease, and schizophrenia, there is a link between the two conditions.

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Where there is smoke, someone is having a weenie roast. Really happy to see this is coming from emphasized text Auto immunity highlights. But I’m gonna stick to my thesis, that if there is a postive response to a gluten free/casein free diet, it’s not enough to just move them from Column S to Column A. I am confident that if it is autism, researchers would do well to scrutinize the kind of autism that is associated with defects in purine metabolism, because purine metabolic disorders have an association with autism. Here’s an example of the research, but it’s in mice http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24937094

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Amen, sistah. 15 15 15

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