What's your definition of "crazy"

My definition of craziness is knowing what’s real and what’s not, but yet denying the reality of something.

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I’ve always thought of the word crazy as more of a social term and less of a clinical/mental illness kind of term.

I don’t use “crazy” to discuss anyone’s symptoms.

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Being so invested in one’s own false interpretation of reality that they can’t function well, or at all.

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My working definition of crazy is choosing Taco John’s over Taco Bell. But seriously I got called crazy the other day by my neighbors cuz I went outside at -20°F with only shorts and t-shirt on so I think crazy is a subjective argument.

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you can say crazy all you want but all it does is infuriate me…stop calling delusional thinking “crazy”…

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Me too I don’t think delusions are crazy, they’re real to us

It’s subjective but for me i use it to describe events or subjects rather than people

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I sometimes say that I’m going crazy when I feel all confused and turned around, usually because of my voices.

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Being too out of touch with reality to socialize at all.

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when people try the dumbest of things ending us looking bad.

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Personally, without trying to offend anyone, I would describe crazy as anything that doesn’t make sense and anyone that believes something that doesn’t make sense, from delusions to ketchup. I like descriptors and though I can come across as offensive I never mean to insult

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Dressing up as a pirate and dancing on the tables at the mall singing Mariah Carey songs. Now that’s crazy. Crazy is a word that I use when I’m referring to something silly. Mentally ill is something more serious.

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I don’t like using the word crazy as it’s used to stigmatize mentally ill people. I like the idea of using it to describe “events and things but not people” but I don’t think society is there yet where we could use it openly as such.

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I agree with @anon54386108.
“Crazy” is more of a social term.

It is not productive to describe mentally ill people as being “crazy”.

It’s an overused term.

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“Crazy” appeals to our sense of diagnostic spontaneity, and in that respect at least, it is deeply social.

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At my job, I’m not allowed to say the word crazy, so I’ve been working on taking it out of my vocabulary in a social context, also. In general, I like to reclaim stigmatizing words rather than avoid them, but it’s easier for me at work if I just get used to not saying it.

Someone on here a while back said we had to fight for our cray rights, and I loved that phrase!

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