Schizophrenia.com

Successful and Schizophrenic - Elyn Saks

#1

This is from last year - but still a good read. I missed it last year:

THIRTY years ago, I was given a diagnosis of schizophrenia. My prognosis was “grave”: I would never live independently, hold a job, find a loving partner, get married. My home would be a board-and-care facility, my days spent watching TV in a day room with other people debilitated by mental illness. I would work at menial jobs when my symptoms were quiet. Following my last psychiatric hospitalization at the age of 28, I was encouraged by a doctor to work as a cashier making change. If I could handle that, I was told, we would reassess my ability to hold a more demanding position, perhaps even something full-time.

Then I made a decision. I would write the narrative of my life. Today I am a chaired professor at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law. I have an adjunct appointment in the department of psychiatry at the medical school of the University of California, San Diego, and am on the faculty of the New Center for Psychoanalysis. The MacArthur Foundation gave me a genius grant.

Read the full story:

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#2

Mmmmmm, law, i don’t know if i could put up with all of that, very unlawful is the law in my opinion.

I would have gone to chef school though, and would have studied music also a bit.

Grey matter going by by now though.

And if i ever get my hands on them they are going to suffer.

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#3

Actually - the research on neuroplasticity (the regrowth of brain matter) shows that your brain can continue to grow and generate during all times of your life if you give it stimulating information and material by trying to learn new things. So - your grey matter can come back…

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