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Please help

i overslept it was like my alarms didnt even go off. i cant do that i have an interview on tuesday. im not making enough money on disability. i overslept because of ■■■■■■■ seroquel. god damn this pisses me off its a job that pays 12 an hour i can not oversleep. please give me a hundred suggestions i want to work at a grocery store, my phone wasnt making noise, my 35 dollar alarm wasnt either. why in the ■■■■ do alarm clocks turn off man?! its not fair its 1.45 in the afternoon this is not fair in any degree im not making enough on disability at all, i need to wake up its like my body didnt even care. ■■■■ if i dont go back to work my slimey ass family is going to put me in a nursing home or state because theyre evil garbage.

i need to wake up. what made alarm clock makers start having self cancel alarm clocks? what am i going to do this job pays 12 an hour and its full time. ■■■■ man

I understand you overslept.
That can happen.

It can be hard to make ends meat on disability.

Try and set up another interview, where, even if you don’t set your alarm; you can make it to.

There are unemployment resources as well; if it’s the choice between a job and being on disability.

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There are alarm APs that make you solve problems in order to shut off. Could you try one of them?

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Don’t take your seroquel Monday night that way you won’t sleep too long Tuesday.

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Take your seroquel at least 12 hours before you have to get up.

Set alarms on multiple electronics on the highest volume.
If you set multiple alarms on your phone, make them all have different ringtones. Set the most obnoxious one at the time you MUST get up.
Don’t space them by more than 7 minutes or you’ll fall too deep asleep again.

Keep some of them far enough out of reach that you have to get up to turn them off.

If you can, and your care provider lets you, work on reducing the seroquel dose so you won’t sleep as heavy. For the first few days you might feel mild insomnia though.

Make a morning routine. Mine is like this:
When the “get up NOW” alarm rings, I drink a big sip of water from a bottle I keep by the bed.
Then I go to the bathroom without dressing, so the cold air wakes me.
Brush my teeth.
Every other day I shower.
I smoke, so I have a morning cigarette outside.
Coffee as soon as I can get my hands on it.

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You can buy alarm clocks that are louder than normal alarm clocks. All I can suggest is taking your seroquel in the early evening so you sleep off the sedation. Also, the old trick if you’re alarm is going off and you automatically shut it off and go back to sleep is to put your alarm clock across the room so you have to get up out of bed to shut it off. And stay out out of bed. Or set two alarm clocks to wake you up. Or if you’re so desperate to get up, set three! Or simply have whoever you live with wake you up in the morning. Maybe try one of those call services that call you at a certain time to wake you up. Or go to bed earlier.

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Came here to say this. I’ve been so sedated before that I’ve shut off the alarm and have no memory of it. But my wife confirms that I did it.

I used to set my alarm up across the room from me, and also, instead of using the buzzer, I’d set it to radio and set the radio dial to in-between stations to produce loud static noise. That helps me get up instantly and forces me to stand up to turn it off.

If I use my phone, I’m likely to hit snooze while I’m half asleep.

Best of luck!

Oh also @Miika is 100% correct about Seroquel. If you take it too late at night you can get a serious drowsy hangover effect the next morning that makes getting started a chore.

Set an alarm on your phone. And force yourself to wake up and drink some strong coffee and maybe make yourself some breakfast. Sleep early and try to make it a pattern.

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