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Childhood trauma associates with clinical features of bipolar disorder in a sample of Chinese patients

CONCLUSIONS:

Significant number of subjects in patients with Bipolar Disorder reported experience of childhood abuse and neglect. Exposure to childhood trauma is associated with age of onset of illness, co morbid PTSD and anxiety symptoms. To study the pathogenesis of childhood trauma on bipolar disorder and explanation the interaction between childhood trauma and susceptibility genes are proposed.

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The Invisible Power of Childhood Emotional Neglect
Emotional neglect can lead to feelings of emptiness and disconnection

Childhood Emotional Neglect happens when a parent fails to notice or respond enough to a child’s emotional needs.

Notice that a parent’s failure to respond is not an event that happens to a child. Instead, it’s something that fails to happen for a child. Because CEN is not an event, it’s invisible, intangible, and unmemorable. It goes virtually unnoticed by both child and parent. A hundred people could be watching an instance of CEN and not one of them would notice.

Because of this, I have seen that the vast majority of people who grew up with CEN have no memory of it. As adults, they are baffled by the source of their struggles. They may look back upon a childhood in which they were loved, and in which all of their material needs were met, and see nothing wrong.

Yet CEN has a profound effect upon how a child will feel and function in adulthood. As a therapist, I have noticed a particular, identifiable pattern of struggles in adults who experienced Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN) as a child. I have identified 10, which fall into two main categories:

  1. Self-care: People who did not receive enough emotional nurturance, discipline, soothing or compassion when they were growing up have great difficulty providing all of these things for themselves as adults. People with CEN struggle with prioritizing their own needs (and sometimes have difficulty knowing what their own needs are), making themselves do things they don’t want to do (self-discipline), and forgiving themselves for their own mistakes or challenges (self-compassion). Indeed, I have seen that people with CEN are typically far harder on themselves than they are on others.

Read the full article here:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/stop-walking-eggshells/201308/the-invisible-power-childhood-emotional-neglect

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