Schizophrenia.com

A mad world A diagnosis of mental illness is more common than ever – did psychiatrists create the problem, or just recognise it?


#1

An interesting article:

When a psychiatrist meets people at a party and reveals what he or she does for a living, two responses are typical. People either say, ‘I’d better be careful what I say around you,’ and then clam up, or they say, ‘I could talk to you for hours,’ and then launch into a litany of complaints and diagnostic questions, usually about one or another family member, in-law, co-worker, or other acquaintance. It seems that people are quick to acknowledge the ubiquity of those who might benefit from a psychiatrist’s attention, while expressing a deep reluctance ever to seek it out themselves.

That reluctance is understandable. Although most of us crave support, understanding, and human connection, we also worry that if we reveal our true selves, we’ll be judged, criticised, or rejected in some way. And even worse – perhaps calling upon antiquated myths – some worry that, if we were to reveal our inner selves to a psychiatrist, we might be labelled crazy, locked up in an asylum, medicated into oblivion, or put into a straitjacket. Of course, such fears are the accompaniment of the very idiosyncrasies, foibles, and life struggles that keep us from unattainably perfect mental health.


#2

creating or recognizing - I think it is both. My psychiatrist acted as if I didn’t have any friends. - only he - hah.
until it came true. He was a lot of probably unconscious criticism of the mentally ill. I could know, silently, that he, too, struggled with mental illness and could not help at all when I had some of the same problems he had. I crashed after I left him.