Schizophrenia.com

The Guessing Game

#1

You want to talk about vague, like in abstract a lot of grey with little evidence or proof? This is the very basis of what psychiatry is really all about. I am not anti meds or anti psychiatry. there have been big improvements over the Thorazine and Institutional days. Many psychiatrists - not all but many actually like to help those of us that are not doing so well. But I am wondering many times to myself - has psychiatry advanced enough?
The evaluations and testing methods on a medical diagnosis is based on a bunch of questions - the testing usually is rather brief. The DSM books, the latest one especially generates more questions than answers. These doctors refer to the DSM 5 when diagnosing. There are no real tangible medical tests to diagnose schizophrenia or other sever MI.
CAT scans MRI’s are basically not valid forms of testing - when it comes to schizophrenia.
when I am not feeling well or displaying a symptom - I will automatically become the doctors personal human guinea pig. I will expose myself and my delicate brain to medicines (toxins) over and over again until we find the acceptable one - there is no cure, just possible remission or stabilization.
Being that I have been a patient for so many years, i realize some things have changed in the psychiatric world, but so many things have remained stagnant. The same old testing methods, meds, overall treatments,follow up etc…
I think we are due for some real positive changes - ones we can live with. I am tired of being a part of what essentially has become one big Guessing Game.

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#2

I admit, there have been times when I too have felt like a science experiment, something to be “observed” but I tried something weird about two years ago when I finally got insurance…

I went to my long time doc when I was doing well. I booked an appointment and had everything I wanted to say written out and I remember feeling sort of ready to “take on the world” when I walked into his office. I was a bit giddy off power I think. I didn’t babble or go off on any tangents. He asked me his questions and I answered them how I still had voices, but I could over come them, this was getting better, that was getting better, this was doing well. He finally sighed and asked, “If you’re doing so well, why are you here?” (I was hoping he would ask that. That question right there was the whole point in going.)

I was able to say… I’m here to show you what I’m like when I’m on top of my game. You never see me when I’m healthy, so you might not know what I look like when I’m healthy. So now you have a basis of comparison." I went on and on about it a bit and gave him my long letter of how and what I’m doing with my symptoms. I think it really changed how he and I deal with each other. We only go when we’re sick or need something. I think it surprised him that I wasn’t sick and didn’t need something. I just wanted him to know… I can be healthy and this is what it looks like.

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#3

The meds and therapy can and do make us better, but I ask myself, at what cost?

#4

It’s a huge cost of time and energy if I’m honest. It’s a very big cost of hope and worry. But for me, when I’m not lucid and it’s hit long enough that I can see, I’m not going to pull out of it on my own, I’m not really worried about the cost. I just want “them” to fix me.

#5

But I also do see your point as well J. I guess Im feeling a bit sorry for myself today. I just wish the treatment methods were a bit less drastic and harsh. But I guess there is a price of some sort to be paid when it comes to regaining health. This applies to all branches.of medicine. But with psychiatry there is a lot of Hit and Miss going on, probably more so than in other medical branches.

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#6

I completely agree with you on that one. It’s hard to take sometimes. You get told… relief will come soon, and it doesn’t. It’s heart breaking. I do get knocked down by that at times. But after seeing how life can be now, I am SO glad I didn’t give up a few years ago.

Ok, I’m a gardener who lives with his sister and can’t figure out the laundry. But I get to surf and I get look at what I’ve planted and say “See all those flowers and that cool smoke tree? I did that.”

You have every right to a low a day, but don’t let it stick around and turn into a month OK? We’re here for you.

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#7

Alot of it has to do with the lack of perspective I suspect. All anybody can do for you is what you tell them. Which is probably why I’ve received multiple diagnosis. More research should be done into the interview. It shouldn’t be so… loose. So casual. It should have a set procedure for diagnosising this or that. Probably each mental illness a different interview…

It should have the ability to cancel out the possibility that the mental disorder is a side effect of an actual tangible disease. You could have something else, cancer, or a broken bone (bone marrow has been shown to get into the blood stream and cause temporary psychosis when people’s bones are broken). It should have a direct one to one correspondence with physical health, and not be compartmentalized into this separate, mysterious mind area.

And there should be less stigma associated with mental illness. It should have the ability to educate. If someone has the gumption to go see a psychologist or a psychiatrist, then they have the capacity, the will to learn about what they’re being diagnosed with. And it shouldn’t be just a pill. Active participation by the patient is required. Its a relationship. “Get to the bottom of the disease.” Between you and your doctor. If a disease isn’t known, it shouldn’t be treated as such. “Cancer”… we know what that is. It can be pinpointed. But due to the fact that psychological ailments are so vague, it has to be a more longterm diagnosis before a decision is reached. It has to be more exact.

Drugs need to be alot more accessible. They need to be a lot less expensive and a lot less lucrative. The whole psychological profession needs to be brought down from its high horse. Which seems a beedy eyed secret agent man, who hides in complicating things. Thats his camouflage for making money.

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#8

@SurprisedJ :smiley: Thanks