Yokukansan (Japanese / Chinese Herb) Effective and Safe in Treatment of Schizophrenia: A Randomized, Multicenter Trial

There are multiple studies listed in the postings below - this herb seems to be helpful for people who have schizophrenia. So be sure to scroll all the way down on this page.

"Our results suggest that Yokukansan has a beneficial effect on Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and on ADL scores and that Yokukansan seems to be a well-tolerated treatment."

and in this study immediately below:

Conclusions. The results of the present study indicate that TJ-54 showed a tendency of being superior to placebo in reduction PANSS scores in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but the difference was not statistically significant. However, compared to the placebo group, TJ-54 group showed statistically significant improvements in the individual PANSS subscale scores.

Abstract

Objectives. We aimed at evaluating both the efficacy and safety of TJ-54 (Yokukansan) in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. This randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted. Methods. One hundred and twenty antipsychotic-treated inpatients were included. Patients were randomized to adjuvant treatment with TJ-54 or placebo. During a 4-week follow-up, psychopathology was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results. TJ-54 showed a tendency of being superior to placebo in reduction total, positive, and general PANSS scores in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but the difference was not statistically significant in both per-protocol set (PPS) and intention-to-treat (ITT). However, in PPS analysis, compared to the placebo group, the TJ-54 group showed statistically significant improvements in the individual PANSS subscale scores for lack of spontaneity and flow of conversation (TJ-54:-0.23 ± 0.08) ; placebo:-0.03 ± 0.08, P < 0.018 , ), tension (TJ-54: -0.42 ± 0.09 ; placebo: -0.18 ± 0.09, P < 0.045 , ), and poor impulse control (TJ-54: -0.39 ± 0.10 ; placebo: -0.07 ± 0.10, P < 0.037 , ).

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Yokukansan is a versatile herbal remedy with a variety of effects … …

Interesting - I’d never heard of this. Thanks for posting:

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Seems safe and possibly helpful:

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that Yokukansan has a beneficial effect on Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and on ADL scores and that Yokukansan seems to be a well-tolerated treatment.

Other research:

Yokukansan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, alleviates the emotional abnormality induced by maladaptation to stress in mice

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You can purchase it from Japan - at this web site (I think - I haven’t tried to purchase - but it looks like they accept orders from anywhere). The dosage in the studies is 7.5 grams of granules per day.

Please post a message if you buy it, and try it.

This is from the manufacturer that I believe who’s product is used in the studies and so its probably of very high quality (from a Pharmaceutical Herbs company in Japan).:

http://www.halph.gr.jp/goods/keg380.html

There is also a company that sells it in Atlanta, Georgia (USA) - probably not as high quality, a manufacturer that is out of China I believe:

100 Grams:
http://www.acuatlanta.net/sun-ten-classics-yi-gan-san-(158)-100-grams-p-45591.html

100 Capsules (50 Grams):
http://www.acuatlanta.net/sun-ten-classics-yi-gan-san-(158)-100-capsules-p-45592.html

for SzAdmin, as well: Did anything come up on long-term trials or longitudinal studies? The reason I ask is that many of the herbal remedies (for many psychiatric disorders) work really well for a while and then fall off as the body habituates to them.

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I have not seen any long-term studies on anything in psychiatry; I think its too expensive and hard to do given the frequency that people with psychiatric disorders move, change living status, go off the grid, etc…

NotMoses - have you ever seen any longer term studies for any psychiatry medication?

I don’t believe they do them.

Even for the released FDA approved medications the studies are only for a few months.

While it’s true that I see a lot more L/T efficacy studies on psychotherapies than I do on meds, I have seen some. The problem, of course, is that the drug manufacturers either don’t want to have the neurobiological laws of tolerance, habituation and diminishing returns stare them in the face or don’t feel compelled by the FDA (they appear to have so much influence over since the early 2000s, maybe earlier) to conduct down-line efficacy studies whether or not they are made public.

What is typical of such studies when they are done and published is that all psych meds, including the anti-Ps and mood levelers, tend to lose effectiveness in their specific corporeal environments over time. (Pts: Not to worry: There are so many of them now that something is almost bound to work if you stay in the hunt. And adding cognitive psychotherapies considerably improves the odds for many.)

I’ve seen several “time lapse bell curves” that suggest that while many have gotten the benefits of, say, Clozaril clozapine for decades, even if they have done so at the nasty price of agranulocytosis, and others that say it quit working in two or three years regardless. Most fall somewhere in between, as with the ostensibly “less effective” (by comparison to Clozaril) anti-Ps.

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That is one problem - but the other problem - as in the case of this Herb - is that if the product isn’t patentable (i.e. nobody has an exclusive license on it for 20 years) - nobody that is going to invest the millions of dollars to do a long term study - when there is no payoff to do so.

And the government only funds very few longer term studies - and even when they do then its more like “how well do early psychosis patients do over the longer term” type of study, not the more specific question of how well they do over the long term with a single herb, supplement or medication.

The cost is just too great. For example just one part of the CATIE studies of 1400 people on antipsychotic medications ( I think the period was for 6 to 9 months, but I may be wrong) was 44 Million Dollars.

http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/archives/002424.html

As I said - the cost is huge and just aren’t in the budget during these fiscally constrained times for government.

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