Why Welfare Is Difficult To Get Rid of in the US

Over 109 million people receive some kind of public assistance in the US. So if you got rid of it then you would have that many people to offer a job to, going to schools you’d have to upgrade to compete in the job market, a ton of food stamps not being paid to the stores, social workers having to find different work, and pharmacists, doctors and therapists not getting paid for treating the poorest patients. If you failed to deal with the monumental issues involved with all this there would certainly be a lot of rioting, more crime than we already have, people begging everywhere you looked, and a lot of people dying because they couldn’t afford to be treated. Of course if those issues were resolved then we would have a truly great society since Americans would have fewer taxes to pay, a more intelligent society, and orderly one as well. I do wonder who would do the less desirable jobs in such a society however.

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I have heard there is a lot of fraud, waste, and abuse in our public assistance system. Do you think that is true? And if so, what do you think can be done about it?

I think that is a general theme…

It takes more energy to recycle than to harvest new resources…

yeah it would seem social security/welfare is integral to the fabric of american society… the Social Security folks have only been kind to me. They say things like “Well… you worked” Implying I earned it. The food stamps folk “Everyone is entitled to what they are entitled to.”

My friends have been supportive. “Use it.”

I mean… fraud be damned (literally)… but for those of us who need it… thank the gods this is a generous nation.

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I totally agree with you. I get food stamps, Medicaid, and SSI. Sometimes I’m paranoid that people think I’m taking advantage of it. Of course much of that paranoia comes from my SZ.

I get afraid that someday this system will not be there for me. I’m not sure what I’d do.

I consider being on Welfare and not being able to drive as legitimate reasons not to have children because I see no way out. I need the counseling and case worker services, drug coverage, and paid Psych Ward crisis coverage that it provides that would be almost impossible to get through other means. I also need coverage for ER care as well. When a private insurer sees medical bills like mine they are reluctant to take it on. It’s also nice to have food stamps as well although I still feel subconscious when I use it. The work and asset restrictions destroy the incentive to work and I don’t want to raise kids sitting on the couch or being almost completely dependent on someone else.

Your post is a little convoluted. There is surely welfare abuse and fraud going on but the vast majority of welfare recipients really need welfare for legitimate reasons… The entire concept of welfare is a sound one. It keeps families off of the streets and it aids the disabled and elderly.

An overhaul of the entire system may not be a bad idea to crack down on welfare cheats but thousands of single women with children need aid. Welfare was brought into existence for good reasons.

Your post reminds me of (then) Governor Reagan emptying all the psychiatric hospitals in California in the seventies without any plan to help the people survive once they were out. Most ended up on the streets and the crime rate went way up as many of the homeless turned to crime in order to feed themselves and survive.

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Define less desirable, though. The most enjoyable job I ever had was a Summer-long gig working as a janitor. If one could actually support themself working as a janitor, that would be my career of choice lol. Very little socializing, just clean, clean, clean and go home. But in reality good luck fully supporting yourself (no government assistance whatsoever) as a janitor. Or as a cashier. Or many of the other “undesirable” jobs. Truth be told a lot of people ON government assistance ARE working the “undesirable” jobs. I made so little working at a gas station that I still qualified for Medicaid (and still needed it, too).

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That’s part of the point. If you have to keep your benefits for whatever reason you do the “undesirable jobs”. I’m not necessarily saying they are the worst jobs in the World to do. They keep you moving and that keeps the weight off and as long as you don’t get hurt are better for your health. But the money is very little and the security in them is scant. I worked at the Library as a volunteer shelver for almost 10 years. My needs were taken care of by my family but my social life was non-existent because I had no real money of my own. I was fine with it for the most part until a woman wanted to be my girlfriend. Then I became rather discontent. I’ve gotten over the discontentment but sadly I have plantar fascitis along with ankle arthritis and can’t do that kind of work anymore for a long period. One day I was looking for books at a Library, found some books out of order, and for a short time did my old job again and an old feeling of well being came back. It wasn’t long before my feet and ankles began to complain and I had to quit however. Essentially since I can’t do what I primarily did before I for all practical purposes have no marketable job skills which is what can happen when you work with your body rather than your mind which many people on welfare do.

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As a democrat I say what the democrats say…“tax the uber rich to ensure the safety of welfare and social security” that means raising the taxes on the rich and we won’t need to go witch hunting for welfare recipients that don’t deserve welfare or social security.

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