Schizophrenia.com

What impact do guidelines actually have on patient outcomes for people with schizophrenia?

Discussion

There appears to be a yawning chasm between the pervasive reverence of guidelines in schizophrenia and the wafer-thin evidence that actually establishes them as effective in improving care.

This is interesting.
Considerable doubt remains about how best to implement guidelines in mental health practice

Considerable doubt remains about how best to implement guidelines in mental health practice

It’s easy to assume that applying guidelines, which endorse treatments shown to be efficacious by research, would be of benefit to patients. But the translation of interventions from the sterile, tightly-bound world of science to the busy, downtrodden local clinic – via the agenda-laden land of guideline production – is not seamless.

The patients are different – there are no exclusion criteria in real life.
The staff are different – they aren’t singled minded research experts.
The interventions are different – squeezed into care, jostling with endless other tasks.

So are guidelines still worth following if they’ve not been backed up by evidence of benefit in real-world implementation?

You tell me.

I think youre right firemonkey, I feel theres needs to be more heart in understanding mental illnesses and problems in life, Guidelines and books are very much secondary. For example my new psychiatrist is a Professor (hes 40 yrs old)…but he knows sweet ■■■■ all about life/mental illnesses despite all the learning he has had to become a Professor. Every time I meet him to discuss my schizophrenia, he looks at me as if Im a fool because I pay heed to the voices I hear.