Schizophrenia.com

Should death make us more or less tolerant?

well for me, i just think, well me and this person will die someday so i don’t get too angry with our differences.

but i could see others thinking “life is too short, to suffer fools”

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This is tough for me, sometimes I want my brother to be humbled by some sort of disease or accident, I would take comfort in his suffering. I got sz so it’s only fair he gets some sort of life changing illness too, he’s also an athlete so something like that would really punish him. Other times I just don’t want to be bothered and don’t wish any ill will towards anybody, I figure life will get to them in some way

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I take it back. I really want him to be humbled by some sort of disease or accident

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I think once I die, tolerance and every other character trait would pretty much be moot.

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Where do you draw the line what is acceptable or intolerable?
What doesn’t hurt you maybe hurt someone else. As i grow older i haven’t got much time to waste. I still do the the same but smarter i hope. When i was younger i had more time to fool around. Anyway, its punk.

It doesn’t really make a difference to me, death. In that respect.

But I remember wen full blown psychotic and I was told I will die and cud feel myself dying, n I was sitting in ae looking at all the people, I felt everyone was so beautiful all of a sudden. It was a really moving experience

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According to “Terror Management Theory” (which could be called Fear of Death Theory), when we are made to think about our death we strive for “symbolic immortality” that our names live on as “good people”. As a consequence of this, when people are made to think about their death (as opposed to going to the dentist), and asked what they think of someone who steps on their national flag, they become more conservative, right wing, and angry “Don’t step on our flag” because, it is claimed, they want to see themselves and their groups with which they identify as good. Thus terror management theory claims that death tends to make us (or at least Westerners) more intolerant.

In Japan however, some claim that the the intolerance effect simply does not exist and others that Japanese instead attempt to increase (not symbolic but) real immortality by forming groups, marriages and having children. There was a higher birthrate after the tsunami for instance. In a sense that shows greater tolerance.

The rest is possibly bunk but…I explain the difference as a function of the modality of self. Westerners tend to think of themselves as their words, and the “I” of their narrative. Linguistic signs are defined in terms of their differences to other linguistic signs so if I or we are good then it implies that others are less so. Japanese may however think of themselves as their faces and enhance themselves not by making distinctions but by for example taking photos of themselves with nice things and places, or imagining their good sides, nice possessions, houses, friends, wives, and children.

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I think it would make us more tolerant. Knowing that our time is limited should make us less petty and less judgmental.

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That was very informative, thank you.

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Yeah, I guess, when I’m dead, I’ll be more or less tolerant. I mean death humbles us all; I guess I would be more empathetic, more or less.

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