Schizophrenia.com

Positive encouragement

positive encouragement, could this be a cure?

the first thing that came to mind was hope but the second was that it has been tried and tested it can only go so far i guess.

what do you think?

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There is some kind of psychological theory that says that a person needs “unconditional positive regard” to get well. I don’t know if it is in favor now.

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yeah i have heard of that, i can’t remember who’s theory it was tho, i don’t think it was freud.

It was Carl Rogers and his therapy was called Person Centered Therapy.

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everybody should be getting this therapy

I like the idea of positive encouragement. Ddon’t know about the therapy.

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My personal experience with SZ is that it is one of those ‘time takes time’ things. Most of us will see ongoing, incremental improvement over a span of years, not the overnight, Earth shattering recovery we all desire. Yes, absolutely, positive thoughts and actions are the foundation of this, but it’s not a fast journey. It’s only after some years where you look back and realize how far along you’ve come.

My 2 cents.

10-96

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While positive encouragement is always a good thing, it can be a bit frustrating for those of us having episodes. I know I get annoyed when my father tries to push positive encouragement down my throat all the time.

I know he means well but it seems overbearing at times and then when I’m not living up to what I feel he’s expecting I get depressed and sink further into my own little world and start feeling like a failure and a waste of space. I’m not saying it causes depression but it gives something for the negative voices to latch on to and ram down my throat saying my father “expects” this out of me, and if I’m not accomplishing it then I must be, by default a failure. And then it’s the hallucinating voices that cause my depression spikes.

This is just my personal experience with “Positive encouragement…”.

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It would be like - pick out what the person’s doing well + point that out -

positive things to say when feeling bad-

  • don’t worry
  • things will get better
  • it won’t stay like this forever
  • you’re not alone
  • have you taken your meds (not a favourite of mine)

people need to remind us that its not all bad and that things will get better because if they don’t then there is no hope for us, hope is one of the biggest fighters against sz in my opinion if we didn’t have any hope we would be lost and i know we all hope we are going to get better.

When my son gets down I list all the things he actually has done in the last few years. I also share strategies with him. Things like breaking tasks down into five minute units. Doing a lot of small things in the day instead of one giant task. Allowing yourself to do things you enjoy. Keeping a “Done” list as well as a"To Do" list. You know the story about the tortoise and the hare!

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When I’m not doing well, and my wheels are coming off… This sort of stuff doesn’t help. Just like @sohare1981 's Dad… I know my sis or my family means well. But it really doesn’t help.

It’s sort of taking a while… and it was a learning curve for all of us… but I think my family is getting better at helping me when I’m slipping.

I do admit… when I’m stronger and doing better… I LOVE it when positive things get pointed out to me. Like the other day…

My sis was giving her room a really good cleaning. Had the bed out in the hall, had the drapes in the wash, that sort of spring cleaning… and she pointed out that I haven’t turned her room over in a few months.

Maybe my compulsion to keep searching her room for “clues” is finally starting to leave me.

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there are certain ways to comfort people like us when we are very unwell i mean all is not lost, even if someone just sits with us and things, when i was really unwell one night i woke my dad and he sat up with me until i felt a bit better, just his presence calmed me down, also sweep has managed to calm me down and help me get out of the house etc because she decreased my paranoia, even my mums dog when i stayed there decreased my paranoia and made me feel more safe like i had some sort of protection.

i realise that sometimes we need more than just words of comfort though, maybe these are the times that we are most vulnerable and need the most care.

i think now that i feel a bit better and stable that these words have more meaning and they do help me, i say things like this on here sometimes to try and help people and i hope that it does help because its all i can do really is offer words of support and comfort.

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That part I completely agree with. You know… if I relapsed and people said that now… I’d most likely do better then I had. Because I would know or remember that things got better.

It’s odd how people handle things differently… there are times when I’m having a panic attack that I need to be alone. Just dim the lights… shut the door, and leave me alone. Please be in the house… but not in my space.

I know that’s the hardest thing for my sis to do. She’s told me how very hard it is for her to just leave me alone when I get to that point. Thank heavens she works on doing it. She’ll sit out side the door and just let me know she’s around. She wants to help, she wants to comfort, she wants to pull me out of it… but she can’t. For me… less is more.

If I get even worse and need her… she’ll be there… but until that point… she’ll leave me be and let me concentrate on my breathing.

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yeah, there are times that i just want to hide away in my room and pull the covers over me, we all need our own space sometimes, i get that.

I sit in the corner of my closet with a pillow. I like having the two corner walls on my sides. Then I know nothing is behind me.

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when i was delusional about 4 years ago i thought that there had been a nuclear attack and i made a little den next to the cupboard with the mattress as a kind of tent and supplies of water and tins of soup inside, needless to say i was hospitalised soon after.

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I go to a church that believes in positive thinking because what you think manifests. They tell me that my thoughts due to my Sz don’t count. The church of happy thoughts and love everyone. I kind of am into it, but I don’t go overboard. I try to offer positive encouragement on this forum. I hope it helps.

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yeah sometimes I like having someone sit with me and let me talk with them, sometimes getting it out of my head helps me not dwell on it so bad. I remember one night I was at my friends house and she had purchased a new bed, box springs and mattress, the whole bed basically. I was sleeping on it with her, (I was just spending a few nights with her and her boyfriend at the time was out on work) the bed broke on my end and it sent me over the edge and had a full blown panic attack that the voices were telling me it was all my fault and I had ruined my best friend’s (almost like a sister to me) brand new expensive bed…

It was a horrible night for me, but she calmly sat with me and talked me out of my frazzled mind. Her mom (who just lived down the street) even came over and sat and talked with me saying it was’t my fault, that it was a shotty bed…and not to worry because she had purchased the insurance that went with it so the store would replace it at no extra cost.

If I had been alone and that would have happened I don’t know how bad it could have gotten for me. Just to have her sit and talk with me and let me know it will be alright and she wasn’t mad at me for anything. Some times the positive can be extremely depressing because it feels like I’m not living up to my potential, other times it can really help because it lets me know that even though I’m down that low I have a safety net when I bounce back out.

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