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Picked a good day for giving up the cigs

Is heavy rain today. No need to brace the elements outside for a ■■■

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Lol when British people use their slang and it gets caught in the swear filter because it means something VERY different elsewhere.

Good luck, you can do it!

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I tried to use it in the title but it didn’t allow it. Honestly 99.9% of brits use that word as meaning a cig. Think Australian too

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Good luck, I hope you are successful. I quit 13 years ago this month. You just have to have the will power and not smoke. It gets easier over time. The first few weeks are the hardest. I don’t even think about it anymore.

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quitting will be very hard.

when I have, I chewed a lot of bubble gum, and sucked on lots of candy. it’s like any addiction, I guess.
one friend told me,
better to lose your teeth than your lungs.

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How does a ■■■ mean a ciggie?

Thanks for the replies folks. 48 hours in. I am lucky in that I live in a tiny village up in the hills. We have no shop here. To get cigs I would need to catch 2 buses to town.

That gives me an slight buffer time to help prevent impulse tobacco purchases

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Walla no I dea where it came from but in the uk the f word totally means cigarette. Very, very few people would use it in the sexuality slur way

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" British slang for “cigarette” (originally, especially, the butt of a smoked cigarette), 1888, probably from ■■■"loose piece, last remnant of cloth" (late 14c., as in ■■■-end"extreme end, loose piece," 1610s), which perhaps is related to ■■■(v.), which could make it a variant of flag(v.)."

■■■ | Origin and meaning of ■■■ by Online Etymology Dictionary (etymonline.com)

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You gotta replace unhealthy habits with healthy ones.

The wind sucks too here

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