Nicotine restores functional connectivity of the ventral attention network in schizophrenia

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Oh, something good about smoking!

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I’m still glad I quit smoking since I’m seldom in this kind of situation. :grinning:

Is the real problem the added gunk that goes to make up a cigarette?

No, just nicotine! You can get it via a patch or an ecig or gum. I get it via an ecig but don’t notice anything cognitive wise though. Maybe if I stopped I’d be worse.

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Vape or nicotine patch. Just sayin’.

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I knoooooow :disappointed:

I realize they spoil the whole, sultry, fiery Latino female vibe you’re trying to project. :grin:

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Comment moved to unusual beliefs!

They’re just a prop. I must quit the prop!

Quitting smoking is one of the toughest things in the world (possibly tougher than chocolate). You have my sympathies.

I quit chocolate now and the cravings are bearable. Last time I tried to quit smoking I started to shake violently. I’m actually scared to quit smoking, but eventually it will happen. Most cigarettes don’t even taste good, I don’t know why I haven’t quit already

I quit for two days and then I find a chocolate stash in the house and I’m screwed (Mrs. Pixel has them everywhere). My sugar detox plans keep going to hell in a handbasket. Honestly have felt like crying a few times over the past week.

Oh, that sucks. I don’t have any laying around the house. On my cheat meal day I usually have chocolate cake, once a week so… :smile: On the rest of the days I don’t even think about it, mostly I want cereal, which I can’t have also.

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> 28 Proven Health Benefits of Nicotine (and 4 potential risks)

When it comes to improving brain function, nicotine is king. There’s quite a few benefits from nicotine that you might not be aware of.

I’ve been saying it for years (and I quit cigarettes 10+ years ago due to the overwhelming fear of cancer): nicotine is not cigarettes. Nicotinic receptors and their associated pathways play significant positive roles in human function.

EDIT: seemed like a good segue to my other post on pregnenolone. Nicotine can help direct preg biosynthesis towards the good and away from the bad. I haven’t read the article this thread is about, but I daresay that aromatase inhibitory effect is in part responsible for the positive association (and statistical prevolence of nicotine use propensity) with Sz physiology.

I’ve wondered why there isn’t a more aggressive push to help people with SZ/A move to a less harmful source of nicotine than cigarettes. Like why it’s not an official thing in psychiatry. At least not that I’ve ever experienced or seen. I think obviously if such extremely high percentages of people with SZ/A are smokers, then there is obviously some sort of self-medicating going on there. I bet my mother would be more inclined to get me a vaping device or something if my psychiatrist advised it as part of my overall treatment. Maybe I will just make it up that she did.

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The word association nicotine = cigarettes = bad mmkay. plays a significant role.

Not all psychiatrists keep themselves up to date with this sort of stuff and many are stubborn and traditionalistic in nature.

But what it most likely really boils down to is the stupidity of lawsuit risk in making recommendations that can in any way lead to outcomes that can be paraphrased to appear negligent. And how many pdocs do you think really actually trust their Sz/SZa patients enough to risk their career over? …

Nicotine IS a poison. It IS addictive. It DOES have a bad side. But at the end of the day, if more people realised that they are just being sheep by ignoring the benefits, then maybe one day soon pdocs will have the freedom and peace of mind to make such recommendations formally (move to vaping).

Scientific method is great, but also it takes a long time for anything to be deemed conclusive - especially when you’re fighting against something like the political nightmare that is nicotine endorsement.