Medication timer device--help?

I recently got prescribed an inhaler. I keep having trouble remembering if I took it in the morning or not. I want to get a box similar to my pill bottle timers, where I can put the inhaler inside, and the lid counts up from the last time it was opened. They have to exist, but my search results are coming up empty. Does anyone know of such a device? It would ideally be transparent, and the timer would start automatically from the time I open the box, without me having to press an additional button. @everhopeful I am tagging you because you tend to be aware of useful gadgets.

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I asked AI and it said:

Hello, this is Bing. I’m sorry to hear that you have trouble remembering your inhaler use. I searched the web for a device that matches your description, but I could not find any product that exactly fits your needs. However, I did find some alternatives that might be helpful for you.

One option is to use a smart inhaler that tracks your usage and sends the data to your smartphone or computer. Some examples of smart inhalers are Propeller, Hailie and Adherium. These devices attach to your inhaler and record when and how you use it. You can also set reminders and alerts on your phone or computer to help you manage your asthma.

Another option is to use a simple timer device that attaches to your inhaler and shows how long it has been since your last dose. Some examples of timer devices are [DoseAlert], [Inhaler Timer] and [Dose Count]. These devices do not require a smartphone or computer, but they may not be compatible with all types of inhalers.

I hope this information is useful for you. Please consult your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these devices, as they may have different instructions and precautions. Take care and stay healthy. :blush:

Source: Conversation with Bing, 26/11/2023
(1) Salbutamol inhaler - HSE.ie. Salbutamol inhaler - HSE.ie.
(2) Asthma Inhalers: Names and Types | Patient. Asthma Inhalers: Names and Types | Patient.
(3) How to use a pMDI inhaler with a spacer – tidal breathing. https://www.asthmaandlung.org.uk/living-with/inhaler-videos/spacer-tidal.

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I think if you are using it twice a day find two spots to keep your inhaler. Or two opener box.
After using in morning keep it back to evening slot after evening usage keep it in morning slot.

I don’t know if this could help.

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I have and love this:

It sends nags to my smart watch if I forget and it reminds me when to refill. It’s free.

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I set alarms on my phone to remind me to take eye drops (four times a day). Super annoying, but I get enough drops in. :smile:

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I appreciate the advice on manual timers, but that is not the issue. I take it in the AM with the rest of my morning meds. When my alarm goes off, I sometimes forget to add the inhaler, since it is a new part of the routine. Then, I have no clue whether I actually took it when I dismissed the alarm. This is also the issue for other manual devices. I will be unsure if I actually took it and just forgot to reset the timer. Does anyone know of an automatic one? (the smart inhalers don’t come in my variety of inhaler)

This is why I use the app. It reminds me separately for pills, Saxenda injection, and taking vitals. I will often forget something without the prompts. I forgot to inject Saxenda for the first three days because it wasn’t part of my routine. I separated it out on the app and then it wasn’t a problem.

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How do you feel about using a day planner? I spend a few hours on the weekends to write in all my meds into the planner for the next one or two months (it’s a 7 am to 10 pm planner, with one week across two pages…I think it’s 8.5 by 11). I cross everything off after taking them.

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So Saxenda is a daily injection? Yikes.

Got it!
Thanks @shutterbug!

I use a huge box for my meds. There’s a divider in the middle. All my AM meds are to the right, and all my pm meds are to the left. Plus I use an app on my phone that reminds me and that I mark as taken after I take them.

Also - my box has a lock combination on it

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actually, this could work. My inhaler has a count down to let me know how many doses are left. I can write what the number should be on my calendar, then if I worry about missing a dose, I can look at the calendar and check if the numbers match. Thanks!

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