Kava as an AP

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/2624519/

This looks interesting. Kava has been linked to liver toxicity in large doses but this study looks pretty promising.

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From the link above on the trial with rats

The effect of kava extract was slight compared to that of the standard antipsychotic drugs chlorpromazine and haloperidol in our procedure.

Kava can cause liver damage at normal doses and for short periods. It’s not worth the risk in my opinion.

https://livertox.nih.gov/KavaKava.htm

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I ordered some Premium Kava from Bula Kava Kava and I’ll report on my experiments in a week after it arrives.

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Please don’t encourage others to try kava. It’s even banned in Europe because of the liver damage potential.

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I would never. I’m just going to experiment and post my results.

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That’s encouraging people.

Scratch that idea.

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Post your results, Kava is widely used here in NZ.

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Do you know what kind of strain they use? I ordered “Nambawan”

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no but iv known people to get from here.

Just looked up the one you orded should be fine.

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It’s a very interesting supplement, it gives you a nice body high and a euphoric type of feeling. I’ll take it for a week and post on how I feel.

In no way am I advocating the use of Kava. I’m simply performing this experiment since I’m slowly tapering off my AP

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Yeah, The people iv know that use it only use it short term like a week or two or only at family gatherings like xmas ect. So maybe the liver concerns are for longer periods of time.

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I’m interested to c how this turns out. Marksdailyapple says kava is safer if it is only the root. He says “There appears to be some concern toward hepatotoxicity. The tendency of some supplement makers to use the leaves and sticks (which contain toxins) to increase yield may lead to hepatotoxicity, but the root itself appears reasonably safe. Preparation may also matter; traditionally, kava is prepared with water, whereas modern processing often uses alcohol. Water-based kava preparations extract different proportions of active compounds than alcohol-based kava preparations. For instance, water extracts glutathione (a powerful antioxidant that our bodies manufacture) from kava, whereas alcohol does not, and this could have ramifications for toxicity. “

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