If you were allowed to live in a Mental Facility and leave during the day

They have got my diagnosis wrong there is nothing wrong with me

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Too late. …

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That is the problem. I walked into the fire and cant find any ice

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Nicely put. It sounds like it sucks, but nicely put.

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Then what are you doing here?? :crazy_face:

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I lived at an assisted living thing / group home for two years, and I’ve been hospitalized twice.

I definitely see some benefits of being such places. There’s always someone to talk to, someone whose job it is to be there and help you. You don’t have to worry about food, or affording rent, and in some cases, they even tell you when to shower, when to clean up, when to eat!
I sometimes miss living there, because I miss not being the one responsible for basically everything. I miss my lack of actions not having much of a consequence.

After living there for two years, I got a lot better, and I started feeling like I wasn’t as sick as the other patients/inhabitants anymore. I felt like the routines were a hindrance to my freedom, and I started getting annoyed that I had to notify someone every time I left or entered the area.
So I moved out. I stayed in touch with them via phone services for a while, to make sure the transition went smoothly, but after a while, I felt like I didn’t need that either.

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There would be some significant problems. For one thing imagine telling a potential girlfriend/boyfriend that your place of residence is a mental facility? Plus what time of the day would they let you out? How would the place of residence look on a job application? How would it be paid for? Why would they let you stay there if you were healthy enough to be in public? We are put in those places for a reason.
They are not hotels.

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You’re right, it’s not a hotel. That’s part of why I left mine anyways. I started feeling like I wasn’t sick enough to be there anymore, and that someone else could use my spot.
I wasn’t well when I moved there, but I was when I moved out.
Recovery is a slow process. We had a lot of freedom, because not many of us were too sick to be out in the real world, but what was common for all of us were that we were unable to live successfully on our own, and that we needed more help than we’d get if we lived on our own.

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