Schizophrenia.com

I have a little screamer in the house


#21

Tell her that children should be seen and not heard


#22

My sister has a son who did that. She used to get down to his level (crouch or kneel) so she could make direct eye contact, and say camly, indoor voice please. She would explain to him that if he spoke in a quiet voice she could hear him better than when he was screaming. With repetition it started to work. Thankfully he has learned or grown out of it, it used to really hurt my head when he did that. A lot of people are using star charts now, where children get merits for good behaviour and demerits for bad behaviour. If they earn enough points they get a treat. Good luck, it must be hard to deal with when you are not well.


#23

#24

It looks like a Deadpool mask. :rofl:


#25

I started off expecting her to go through the morning without screaming and I would give her a small piece of candy then gradually extend the hours. After a few days, she got tired of it and informed me that she “didn’t like candy” and began screaming again.


#26

I had tantrums as a child. My mom did what you did. I stopped.


#27

That looks illegal…


#28

I don’t have kids, but I used to work with them. It’s all about consistency. Naughty step and ignoring are good techniques, but you have to be consistent no matter how much she screams and acts up, so she learns she can’t get away with it.
If she runs away from the naughty step, put her back on it. One minute per year of age.

Also, try to stop the meltdowns before they escalate.
Don’t keep trying to reason with her if she’s already reaching the stage of unreasonable anger. That’ll just make her more aggravated. Give a warning, and institute the consequence if she doesn’t calm down.

And if you do use the naughty step, don’t hover over her while she’s there. Ignore her completely and quietly walk her back to it if she gets up before her time is up. She’s 4, so 4 consecutive minutes.


#29

I would think that the screaming would tire her out eventually.


#30

Maybe you could tell her that if she settles down and stays quiet for an hour you will give her something she really wants. Try to find something she really wants. It might be an ice cream cone, or a Barby doll, or anything Maybe this will work.


#31

That’ll only teach her she gets things for throwing tantrumd as long ss she quiets down afterwards.
Opens up for a lot of manipulation


#32

I can’t take you seriously daydreamed with that avatar pic.:smile::smile:


#33

i’m trying to write a love poem lol


#34

Geez, that is one determined kid. I hope you can fine a solution that works.


#35

Squirrelette was a screamer for a few months around age four. I was at work for quite a bit of it, but it nearly drove Mrs. Squirrel around the bend. One thing that worked was setting aside a small bit of money for a monthly treat. Every time there was a fit, a Loonie (Canadian dollar a.k.a. “Canuck buck”) was removed from the change jar and we did it in front of her. Less treat money for her. We also had pictures of things she wanted and the prices by the jar. As the value dropped, the more expensive options disappeared from the pile of pictures. The kid got the message.

Fair warning: The damn thing has been in my wallet ever since, so beware The Law of Unintended Consequences.

As to other options, sounds like isolating the child is not a very viable option and best saved for Plan B. Punishment should always be Plan C (there are times when it is warranted, but I prefer to seek out creative solutions first).

Hope this helps. Hugs to you from one parent to another - this is a darn tough situation.

:heart:


#36

Thank you @MrSquirrel!!! :slight_smile: