How will TTIP affect the health of Europeans?

Potential benefits

The transatlantic trade deal could be the starting point for closer cooperation between health authorities on both sides of the Atlantic. Specifically, closer cooperation between the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could lead to improved consumer access to innovative medicines and substantial exchanges of information on safety issues and inspections. (…)

Potential threats

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TTIP calls for a harmonised definition of ‘commercial confidentiality’ across sectors and specific confidentiality provisions for pharmaceuticals. As such, we are concerned that the broad definition of commercial confidentiality in the US could hamper the progress made in Europe so far.

All the more so after the US pharmaceutical industry urged the US Government to “engage with the EU in every possible venue” to resolve the problems raised by the new EU data sharing policy[4].

Clinical trials reports should not be considered commercially confidential and public health interests should prevail over commercial considerations.

Moreover, we are concerned about the bigger role negotiators want to give to pharmaceutical companies in pricing and reimbursement decisions. Currently, the price of a drug in Europe is fixed after negotiations between the government and the pharmaceutical company. Granting more power to the industry will likely lead to less affordable medicines in Europe.

Additionally, we do not want TTIP to delay consumers’ access to cheaper generic medicines- by changing the patents extension. The longer a time the patent of a drug is extended by, the more time it takes for the generic, cheaper alternative to hit the market, thereby burdening consumers’ pockets. Finally, we will oppose any attempt within TTIP to include provisions regarding industry information to patients. Unlike in the US, in Europe ‘direct to consumer advertising’ (DTCA) of prescription medicines is prohibited, as it leads to inappropriate and costly demands for medications. The EU ban on DTCA should not be called into question.

(…)

What is the TTIP you ask?

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2015/jul/03/what-is-ttip-controversial-trade-deal-explained

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I hope it doesn’t threaten our national health systems or the ban on DTCA. I am cautiously optimistic about this. I don’t read the news much anymore so I hadn’t heard of this before now.

It’s not on the news actually, hardly! It’s a hush hush trade agreement, they can’t even take notes or photos of the agreement to share with the public, it’s been forbidden. I’m actually worried about this, less regulation, more money on meds… I signed the petition against it, I don’t think EU and US politics should mix, EU can live well without the US lobbies I think.

Like you, I have become cynical about the pharmaceutical companies. That CEO who charged $750.00 a pill for an essential drug really makes me wonder. I guess they are taking it easy on us at the lower end of the economic spectrum by giving us coupons, but that $750.00 a pill price tag for an essential drug makes me wonder what else somebody might be trying to pull off.

Well, that doesn’t exactly bode well for this trade agreement…

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Signed several petitions some time ago.

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I’m personally pretty worried about TTIP. Not really a fan myself

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Terrific, something else to worry about! :imp:

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Good article @firemonkey