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How do you treat your Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?


#41

Thanks for the update! Too bad! Good luck with quitting…


#42

Ssri do not work for my OcD they make it worse and give me agitation

Mirtazapine is very good for me with this problem


#43

Lexapro and therapy, I’m mostly over my OCD now, thankfully.


#45

I think my OCD has gotten easier to manage as I’ve gotten older. It doesn’t get in the way of my life anymore. I’m not sure if it’s because of the neurofeedback, or if I just grew out of it. Nowadays, the things that used to send me into panic attacks are just part of my daily routine. I can put on my socks without using gloves, I can leave doors open, I breathe normally instead of in a weird pattern, and I can use the number 3 whenever I want. Pretty much my only leftover symptom is weirdly turning my head to look at different light sources out of the corner of each eye. And even that one is mostly under control.


#46

My OCD has greatly decreased due to response interruption (CBT). Gradually increasing the time between the obsession and the compulsion, as I said, has significantly helped decrease my OCD.


#47

I’ve been fighting my OCD for a couple of years now. It waxes and wanes with stress. Yoga and exercise seem to help relieve the tension in a healthy way instead of my OCD. When I catch myself doing it, I tell myself to stop, sometimes I can for a while. When I can’t I get upset and OCD more, get upset more and it cycles around. So far the best remedy is distraction. Keep my hands busy doing something, anything. Typing, holding a book with 2 hands, knitting, needlepoint, petting the cat, doing puzzles, cooking, etc… I’m trying to do a CBT self-help book but am finding it very difficult to do on my own, guess I need the help of a professional. I tried zoloft in the past but it turned me into a zombie and didn’t really help the OCD.


#48

You are right, we need to learn no not to believe our thoughts