Hitting the wall

my clinical psychologist warned me of having a relapse or hitting a wall…
i think i hit the wall.
i explained to my therapist when i am ill, it is like i am staring at a blank wall…
but getting better, there is now a window in the wall with a beautiful garden beyond and an oak tree and wonderful creatures…
it is so near this garden of solitude, but where is the FECKING DOOR !?!

no need to reply, just fecking pissed off, and my humour eludes me.
take care people of earth :alien:

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Crawl out the window.

Option 2: break down the wall

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sorry you’re having a hard time hunni…to quote the infamous darksith “know that someone cares” and i hope you feel better soon, much love, jayne xxx

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Hope you feel better soon sith

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hope you feel better soon, at least there’s a window for you. I’m trapped in a windowless white room right now with an angry woman shouting at me telling me things I don’t want to hear like how worthless and pathetic I am…

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Maybe you could look everywhere again for a door. I’ve had no experience with walls.

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Reminds me of a feminist story called The Story of an Hour. It’s a quick read, a short story. You’re going through what will make you happier in the end. The therapy is obviously painful for you, mine can be painful at times too. You are going to come out of this healthier and happier. I myself have had a downward spiral which resulted in self destructive behavior this morning, I didn’t sleep more than three hours last night.

The key is to face hell when it comes your way, but to never ever voluntarily walk into that place. I refused my meds this morning and it was fun for a while and then I wanted out.

I trust clinical psychologists. Do whatever yours tells you to do and good things will most likely happen. They are professionals who know us better than we think we know ourselves. Just don’t get to the point of refusing your medications because you want to suffer and punish yourself for not even doing anything wrong. In your situation, your pain may be part of healing, but do not associate pain with victory like I do. I am highly functioning and it’s safe to say that I have overcome the illness, but I am only human. I ■■■■ up. I get the wrong ideas in my head and act out on them. I always recover but I suggest you do not learn the hard way like I do. I am stubborn as a ■■■■■■■ bull. Or ass. Whatever. I have incidents that I don’t really talk about, I try to be an example for what professional help can do, but I have my moments.

Hang in there and know that I actually do care. You are a positive person and I think that you are stronger than you realize.

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you know Charlie and the chocolate factory one in it they go through a tiny tiny door into the garden of all things sweet and glorious. you know your wall has to be gone through its just pissing you off and that ok your doing your best that’s all you can ask.

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I hope you feel better soon darksith. I know you can come through this.

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I’m sorry to hear you hit that wall. I just wanted to wish you luck in getting through that wall. I do hope you feel better soon.

There were parts of my CBT that hurt and brought up a lot of pain …stuff I buried pretty deep.

Digging it up hurts. But after a while… it finally heals. (Now some stuff is sort of like a trick knee that can tell you when it’s going to rain. If that makes any sense)

I can understand the frustration.
I would get so upset at the wall… I was doing so well… why the wall?

But please trust… it will come down. I’m rooting for you and hope you get that wall down very soon.

I’m hoping the best for you.

:bug: hug. (it makes me smile when you mention he has a big heart but little arms.)

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Is there a way to test for a rhythm disruption/problem? Would that lead to a solution?

http://www.buzsakilab.com/

Brain oscillations form a hierarchical structure: slower oscillations phase-modulate the power of faster rhythms. These mesoscopic temporal structures (i.e., brain oscillations) have been fully preserved throughout mammalian evolution and have constrained both the evolutionary and ontogenetic scaling of brain structures. Some rhythms are region-specific while others are ubiquitous. Oscillations are robust and easily quantifiable phenotypes and various brain systems have unique constellations of oscillations. Twin studies show just how tightly genetic factors control brain rhythms. In some cases, both the genes and mode of inheritance have been determined. Every psychiatric disease is associated with some kind of rhythm problem. Importantly, mice and rats have brain oscillations with the same pharmacological profiles as humans, and therefore serve as important targets for drug discovery. Our actions and perceptions are strongly affected by the constellation of rhythms. For example, rhythms can strongly bias which part of the text you are reading now will be remembered tomorrow.

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Hang in there @darksith - things will get better soon, I am sure of it

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I hope you find your way out soon.

In the words of REM, “hold on, hold on.”

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Sith, you have been here And left everyone a heart. Are you related to San-----? No you couldn’t be.

Keep Truckin’

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I’d rather meet up with a blank wall that I can hit than meet up with a person with a blank face. That, I’m not allowed to hit.

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