Schizophrenia.com

For those of you who work

…what job do you have?

I’m trying to figure out if I can ever work again, so I’m looking for some inspiration. I feel like all the skills I had before getting sick are out the window.

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I work, but my job is in the cannabis industry; I live in a legal state. I don’t recommend getting into that industry if you have a cannabis problem, though. I suppose that’s obvious, lol.

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I’d think it would be the opposite.

I once had a job reboxing TVs that were returns. To this day I hate big screen TVs. I have 2 TVs in my house that are both 32”. And one was a gift.

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I’m trying to find work again. Originally I was going back for my CDL, but was talked out of it. 14 hour days are too much for me to handle.

contact your unemployment office and tell them you’ve been on disability and they can direct you to a govt. agency that can appropriately place you in work.

At least that’s how it’s done in the states.

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I work part time in a book shop, 3 hours a day and a love it!

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I work part time as a librarian.

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I’m a temp in a second hand store. I like it a lot.

I couldn’t work at first though. After I got sick I struggled and there was a period of about 3 years that I didn’t work at all, but then I got into a work programme where you work at a place to get work experience and see how much work you can take, but the government pays your wages. That turned the tide for me and I have mostly been able to work part time after that.

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I try to get back on track as a programmer. I do some volunteer nonsense . It difficult given I don’t care for anything at all.

The biggest obstacle for me is that I just don’t want to work not even for food. And that is coming from someone who experienced starvation.

If you want to work you will.

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I used to work in behavioral therapy, then switched to administrative work for a special needs charity. Then I quit to be a stay athome parent,and im now working on getting my PhD in neuroscience.

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I think a program like that sounds great- the idea of getting back to work without additional support sounds way too daunting to me. Glad it worked out for you.

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I’m a student. 1515

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Insurance broker specializing in solutions for small to medium sized companies. I’m more in policy maintenance, compliance, and risk management. I support the customer facing people who are good at sales, but not so good with details or organizing stuff.

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I’m a peer support specialist.

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I was volunteering in a charity bookstore that sells recovery related books (AA NA Al-Anon ect)

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I was working as a waiter part time, six months after hospitalisation.

Did it for a year and a half. Alongside a degree I started three months into it.

It is possible to work.

Someone above said it, if you want to work because there’s a strong drive (and the appropriate level of support behind you to boost your confidence subconsciously) then you will be able to, if it merits enough reward

Unfortunately reward feelings or systems are quite dysfunctional for us, so if it does work at first , it will be a climb. But I personally think it is possible

I’m aiming to do a PhD just like another user up above,

That would also be full time, so it’s definitely something you could try (I don’t meant studies and PhD , I mean a full time role of work of some sort)

Restaurants are busy, and people facing, I managed for the most part very well. According to managers , they were happy to have me because I was a gd face to the waiting team

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I work at a 7-ELEVEN AS A CASHIER

It helps because you stay busy with people and side work like stocking, making food, making coffee, things like that.

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I like jobs that don’t stress the symptoms out of me. I know I’ve found a good one when I can survive a year at the same job. My last job was working for a sports data company and performing work done on a computer. It was super simple and it was 2-3 times a week which was ideal. This job was in person pre-covid, then remote post-covid.

Maybe you can look for a remote job. Usually you don’t have a supervisor breathing down your neck and you may have to check in periodically through zoom meetings. That would be a good start, search “remote.”

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That seems like such a cool job to have have. I’d rather that then the one I have now as it can be so tiring

I want to get back into the workforce, as a janitor again. I did that job for a week before going to the hospital last year. I think I can do it

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I am a Landscaper and have my own business. I do pretty well out of it, and I am doing something I enjoy that also makes me much fitter due to the manual labour - and it’s pretty creative

I started this in March 2020, but had another landscaping business between 2008-2013 previously.

Between 2013-2020 I worked in an office, and my commute was an hour each way. The amount of stress I had in that job in the end finished me off to resulting in a suicide attempt.

The office politics really got to me, and the company got taken over and all the people who had guided me and respected my contributions to the company left.

The person made my line manager was an absolute piece of ■■■■, and I ended up leaving because of him in the end

During those 6/7 years I had multiple relapses, and massive problems with anxiety.

Honestly, I’d take working for myself outside working out all day vs. being sat in front of a computer all day and having to deal with the ■■■■■■■■ who get a kick out of putting other people down to further their own careers.

It became toxic

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