Do you have your simple thing to keep your high-functioning life?

I have lost motivation during past 6 months since recurrence.
I wonder how you keep your high-functioning life.
Is there a simple but fundamental thing to motivate yourself and change your mindset?
For me, when I was functioning, I woke up early and took a shower in the morning.
Or I kept my room clean. These look unrelated but changed my mindset to start the day with some passion. But now I have difficulty focusing on my work being lazy. I wake up late and can’t sit down on a chair more than a minute. I’d like to ask what you might have to keep your life?

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I hav it in my head to always try my hardest to do the best for myself even if it seems difficult. Other then that geodon works well for me as a med

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If I don’t wake early I feel the day is wasted already and end up slacking off being comfortable. I like a clean area too, have a hard time functioning if my area is a mess no matter what I’m doing. It’s hard because I want to be a morning person just usually am not.

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It’s hard. I’ve found exercise helps heaps. I do a lot of walking. Keep it simple but you’ve got to do it everyday and do enough to make a difference!

I’ve found it a catch 22 situation. You get no motivation from sitting around but if you can force yourself to get regular it’ll help heaps and lead to more exercise. It’s hard. I’ve been there.

Exercise has really improved my motivation!

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Yeap doing exercies is one of the most efficient way but overlooked easily to keep you alive. I should try it even it is hard to start.:joy:

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I kept reading everyday no matter how long or how short it could be. This is something that stimulates my brain and refreshes my life, which gives me a ray of sunshine in this dark and boring world.

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Exercise is key. I used to be a distance runner up until about 5 years ago. I’ve logged countless miles, maybe 10,000 or so. I work a repetitive job (volume sales) and I find I can be engaged every day, every week, month and so on. i can only attribute this to the distance running; my brain can focus and go. not to say for you to go out and run marathons, but it’s food for thought.

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I maintain daily TO DO lists. I make sure I complete them no matter how horrible I’m feeling. It was hard at first but eventually it becomes easier to push past symptoms and just do things. Healthy habits are important.

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I agree that exercise is extremely important. It helps physical health, mental health, energy, and motivation. I’m happier when I exercise, usually.

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Doing what is hard makes life easy.

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Yeap that is why I’m planning something challenging…!

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maybe you changd your meds? that can explain this. but Dayle routine holden me up

Yes I changed my meds and it is quite positive. I restored my peace and I’m so glad about this. But I need to work on my projects and it is hard to start. I’ve been thinking to make my routine like others. I think it will help…!

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o.k having a routine is better then non. its for sour

I feel like I’m low functioning but some would describe me as moderately to high functioning. I can drive a bit, walk, eat, sleep, poop, talk with family and a couple of friends, etc. I feel like if my sz was cured, I would have a lot of potential.

Focus, mantras. I dont even have to move or think. Just be,and meditate at peace wherever i am

I second @velociraptor’s advice. You have to continually push yourself in an organized way. Write lists, use reminders and alarms, keep a calendar, and keep them visible for most of your day so you never forget about them. Avoid and manage stress. Build healthy, productive habits. When you’ve made it a habit, it becomes easy. There is a way out of avolition. It is not a life sentence.

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I wish it were simple, but I have to find motivation. Probably what motivates me the most right now is taking care of my girlfriend, mother and cat (yes, cat).

Motivation has always fascinated me, and here are some examples: A young woman, who hardly ever read books, read 30 books in 30 days (cover to cover). All of the books were about breast cancer. Her mother was in stage 4 of breast cancer, with a prognosis of 60 days to live. Another example: You say you’re terrible at remembering names. I tell you that I will give you $100,000 if you can correctly remember the name of the next person you meet. I will ask you for the person’s name in 24 hours. I think the chances of you remembering the person’s name will increase–a lot.

So I need to keep growing and giving.

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limenlemon. take it one step at a time. i used to pace a whole lot when i couldn’t sit still but when i was done pacing i would try to do something positive.

good luck to you.

judy

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I’m high-functioning “outdoors”. I could be borderline psychotic and still be successful at a date, job interview, evening with a friend or volunteering activity.

Staying high-functioning inside my own mind and own house is way more difficult, I don’t think I’m highfunctioning there/in reality. I’m ADD-ish (no diagnosis) and have a hard time doing my household. What seems to help is to cut up tasks in crazily tiny and concrete pieces. If I think “i have to clean my whole house today, it’s a mess”, I don’t oversee it, panic, and stay in bed. If I think “today I have to clean my kitchen” it is still too much. Sometimes “before having lunch I’ll do my dishes” helps. Often I have to make it really really tiny though… e.g. “right now I am going to put all the empty glasses in the kitchen sink”. After, I think “before lunch, I will wash the glasses”. Etc. I won’t panic and when I’ve done it I often feel happy and content, even if it was a ridiculously miniscule task, and because I’m happy I’ll find energy to do the next baby-task.

It sounds really stupid, like how you would instruct a little kid, but somehow it works better for me.

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