Schizophrenia.com

Discrimination


#1

Common types of discrimination: (including, but not limited to)
• Age
• Gender
• Disability
• Language
• Nationality
• Ethnic
• Religious

And I am discriminated against the following more than disability.

Language
Diversity of language is protected and respected by most nations who value cultural diversity. However, people are sometimes subjected to different treatment because their preferred language is associated with a particular group, class or category.

Ethnic
Discriminatory policies towards ethnic minorities include the race-based discrimination of ethnic Indians and Chinese in Malaysia

Source: Wikipedia


#2

I think that anyone that is ‘different’ than the ‘norm’ faces challenges. I myself am different in that i usually have opinions that are outside the usual. I accept that is the case and look to express myself ;handle contention with humour and wit and in some cases :slight_smile: try to find common ground.


#3

I’ve been discriminated against for being a minority in certain situations, namely living in the inner city when I was younger. I was a small white girl in a majority black neighborhood. I was sent to Catholic school but during the summer I went to a camp. The teasing probably wasn’t as bad as if I was a boy, but I was also a tom-boy and had short hair. The emotional aftermath of being bullied is hard to overcome, but remember that you aren’t the only victim of discrimination (that doesn’t make it OK) but you’re not alone.


#4

No, your observation is very interesting. Differences in opinion-- which means you’re able to think out of the box. It is a great character trait.


#5

I would add sexual orientation.

In the work place, I have faced hate when working as a minority in a mostly female black workforce. Often it would depend upon the leadership. I work in healthcare. If the healthcare leadership was respectful, black people did not openly hate the minority of white folks working–there was often an energy about the workplace that was hip and motivating. When not respectful, minority whites, such as myself, worked with a major lack of respect and teamwork from black co-workers–even hate at times. (For me the experience was odd, because I grew up with black folks. None of the co-workers who hated me knew my background.)

When it does happen, I do not let others hate directed at me affect my outlook on politics and social justice.

In the workplace I have also witnessed discrimination against individuals due to sexual orientation. Often times, an individual would quit his/her job. I have spoken up against the discrimination when one young lady was receiving backbitting insults. I have seen 3 co-workers face such type of discrimination. They usually quit.


#6

This is no good. I don’t know this could happen to the majority white dominant country. It is too sensitive to talk about discrimination on a public forum, at least I am worrying.


#7

Plumber, I communicate. Communication is a major tool and I support communicative processes. However, I respect those who do not want to communicate. I am political and am a major supporter of social and environmental justice.

Is it folks in the first grade now where whites are no longer the majority? It doesn’t matter to me as long as we respect one another.


#8

Thank you for your willingness to communicate.

I am religious, but I am nobody when comes to social and environmental justice.
Bloggers from my country may have freedom to speak and criticize but often get into trouble (for example, detention)
While I abide by the laws, I submit to God for Him “to intervene in human affairs and usher in true justice and righteousness”.


#9

Express yourself!


#10

The Psalms has your back : )

I have friends in Burma—I am quiet when I think about them and what they face. I have followed Watson at Dictator Watch, speaking up sometimes.

In the States, discrimination takes place a lot. I rarely bring up my own experiences. In all-black communities or workplaces, sometimes whites are discriminated against. It depends on the leadership. I rather speak up for leading black activists who respect all folks, then fuss over what I do not accept.


#11

Plumber, what discrimination have you faced?


#12

Belonging to a community mainly formed by ethnic Chinese in my country, once in a while we were told to ‘Go back to Ch***’ by the majority Mal** while the ethnic Indian were told the same to ‘Go back to In***’. Ocassionally the Chinese will also take revenge on the majority ethnic group by telling them to ‘Go back to Indo*****’. This has been a vicious cycle.

Personally I wasn’t discriminated against that much. It is more a discrimination of the group which I belonged to, basically it is the language and my ethnicity.
Among these, the most offensive behaviour I encountered was when 4 to 5 tourists from the West getting on a train in Kuala Lumpur, they weren’t hesitant to criticize the broken Malaysian English, and when the broadcaster announced through the air ‘Mid Valley Station’, they were making fun of it-- ‘Mid Walley Station or Mid Valley Station’. I especially remember this because one of the shorter Chinese guy standing in front me was shocked while looking at them.
Sorry this has nothing to do with the general public in the West. When I am in Australia, everyone is nice to me.


#13

People generally dislike the fact that I am a schizophrenic bisexual atheist. It’s quite a triad of traits. But then I school them on being inferior to me and then they must submit. Jk. I think normal people are boring unless they are ambitious, intelligent, independent minded, ect. Attractiveness can win me over in some cases but I like for people to have their life together and have dreams and intelligence, not just be cute and really tasty looking. But sometimes I think with my little head.


#14

The ‘Look’ and the ‘Brain’ are both important. Yes, I agree with that.


#15

My body is a reflection of my brain. Built. 5ft7in and 180lbs. Big muscles. Masculine face. Very light body hair, practically none. Strong chin. But just something wrong with the way I look. Intimidating, creepy. Dangerous, powerful. Just not not normal, abnormal.


#16

Yes, I know, I saw your photo.

It is good to have muscular body. Depending on occasion, sometimes it is preferrable to have proper dressing and grooming, but in rare occasion (I think so), it is okay to show off your body.


#17

I dress like a bad boy. Red jeans and a black t-shirt, black and white sneakers. Outfit of choice. In the summers I wear cargo shorts and a fitted t-shirt with my black and white sneakers and calve-high skull and crossbones socks.

The only colors in my wardrobe are red, black and white. I have one two-toned blue shirt (looks like Ashitaka’s shirt, a character from a Hayao Miyazaki movie) and one green Attack on Titan t-shirt. Attack on Titan is a popular violent and serious anime.

Right now I am wearing dark red pants and a fitted black t-shirt with a white triquetra (celtic symbol) on it.