Coping with schizophrenia

Hey guys,
Just waiting on the miracle drug to give me the last decade of my life back. In the meantime, aside from taking medication, im trying to get out with friends, and visualize my goals. What strategies do you have to help you accept and handle your impairments?

Hope. And small incremental steps.

I’ve taken to trying to learn the guitar and write a pretty useful computer program…

And working out.

I’ve been making friends lately. It was going alright. Went over to one of their house’s. Got a bit weird.

Keeping that kind of ■■■■ as a downtown only thing.

Her rents were glad to meet me. I think.

Anyways. Hope. Track the small progresses and don’t take them for granted when things slow down or you slip.

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I have a trick I play in my mind. Whenever a situation, mind circus, or intrusive thought appears that is out of my control, I take deep breaths and say to myself “I’ll find a solution, this will go away”. It always does.

Aside from that, I’m slowly (very slowly) getting my life back together after years of trying to ruin it. Trying to form healthy relationships, paying off by debt, going back to school, figuring out what I want from life and ways to attain it, sobriety.

I’ll get there.

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In early recovery i had to admit aloud that " i am powerless over my mind" and the visions would disappear . being that i trusted the good spirit would guide me

My recovery is focused on getting my med regime right. I’m on abilify, and for me it’s a lot of work:

  1. I need to get blood tests to be sure it’s not doing anything nasty.
  2. I need to take metformin as it’s raised my blood sugar (see (1))
  3. I need to take something to combat the anxiety and restlessness.
  4. I need to take a bcomplex to prevent abilify induced weight gain

Abilify is a lot of work for me, as it took a long time to figure out the things above. I too am waiting for a miracle med, but in the meantime, it’s just trying to tolerate /live with abilify. It keeps me sane.

I disregard the illness and plunge on.

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A friend once said to me, “to deal with this illness, you gotta love a good fight.” Sz swings hard at us, and we have to swing back and get up every time we’re knocked down. If you relapse or are hospitalized, you get stabilized, and get back in the ring. They always say that the most successful fighters are a little left of center. It’s not that they don’t feel the pain of a tough blow, they just don’t let it stop them from delivering a hay-maker of their own. (I hate the violence of a physical fight, but it makes for a good analogy).

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Procrastination. Heaps of it.
Returned serve, "No time for that sticky bit of complex drama, will you please try your call again later-thank you, goodby"
and off I push them out into the road, never looking back.

Unfortunately, no one listens to me, so I repeat often, as often as necessary, or until I forget the sticky bit clinging to my head.

Which only does me well, unless it carries a stiff penalty for forgetting.

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I just grab the bubbles and run. No time to stop or look back.

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