Schizophrenia.com

Autism strengths

I’m reading a book about life on the spectrum.

There is a chapter on emotional differences, and the author attempts to reframe some of those challenges as strengths. They are:

Capacity for pleasure
Courage
Optimism

For those of us on the spectrum, do you agree?

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math abilities and logic formerly.

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Pleasure-reduced
Courage- not very courageous
Optimism- glass half empty type

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Docs are still on the fence regarding whether I have autism or bpd.
But
Pleasure - I take joy in the simple things. Making me smile is by no means difficult.
Courage - I’m timid, but I’ve done a lot of things others would say took courage.
Optimism - I’m optimistic. Some would say naive. I like to believe the best in people and their intentions, and to hope for a good outcome even if the odds are against it.

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I feel lots of pleasure, but the things that tickle my pickle are not the same things NTs may enjoy. I’ve learned to be more courageous, failure is an important driver of growth. I’m less of an optimist than a realist. I see everything in patterns, and a lot of patterns have unfortunate outcomes.

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I disagree with this assessment.

Saying ’ oh actually these people can feel pleasure ’ seems like the author feels like he/she is on some sort of revelation that actually we can feel some degree of pleasure. It’s the use of the word capacity… Seems contextually used here as a tool to contradict a stereotype of a flat expressionless face with more going on behind it.

Courage. I am blunt and will say the truth of my thoughts without really thinking about consequences. Could be classed as courage but that is not intentional, just a byproduct

I am not optimistic. I wish I could be but my brain is wired into catastrophic thinking

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The author’s reasoning for each is this:

Capacity for pleasure - When you engage in an activity you enjoy, you probably have more fun than a neurotypical person would doing the same activity. Because all your emotions are experienced in an intense way, you get the benefit of extreme joy.

Courage and optimism - When you feel your emotions so intensely, you are less apt than a neurotypical person to use self-talk to regulate the level of arousal. Because you may not always think about your own reactions to events, your passion may at times cause you to persist in your pursuit of something despite “rational” reasons to stop. There is less communication between the thinking and emotional brain, which can result in incredible courage and optimism.

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In this one statement, I’m conflicted. Does it display courage, or simply the lack of better judgement?

Having said that, I have achieved a few things in my life that others might believe impossible. Asperger’s has allowed me to step out of the box of "ordinary " thinking, I’m sure

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I don’t know how I feel about that one either. I had the same thought you did.

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as i understand it,

limited interests = capacity for pleasure, extreme joy
lack of fear = courage & optimism, rational thinking (or lack there of)

i find the authors reasoning is true to my experience.

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I agree with all three

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Hah. Wish I had that problem. I get anxiety over having to make eye contact. Not sure they’re talking about the right medical condition in this one.

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